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Conflicting ideologies: When the ideological Meets the Perceived and Operational- A Study of primary teachers' attitudes, perceptions and practice of Seychelles Creole (Kreol Seselwa) and English as mediums of instruction in the Seychelles Primary Schools.
Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies. (LITUM)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1341-3854
2018 (English)In: Norsk og internasjonal lærerutdanningsforskning: Hvor er vi? Hvor vil vi gå? Hva skal vi gjøre nå? / [ed] Kari Smith, Norway: Fagbokforlaget, 2018, p. 129-151Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper builds on Zelime & Deutschmann, 2016, where we examined language ideologies/directives in the Ideological and Formal domains of the curriculum in a multilingual postcolonial context – the Seychelles. Our overall conclusion from this work was that there was a clear mismatch between the roles that different languages were ascribed in these two domains. In this paper we look at manifestations of the Ideological and Formal curricula in the Perceived and Operational domains of the curriculum, more specifically, the language beliefs, attitudes and classroom practices of primary school teachers. We base our findings on questionnaire answers from 142 respondents in 22 primary schools, coupled with classroom observations and teacher interviews. The Seychelles has a fairly typical postcolonial language-in-education system and follows a transitional model of medium of instruction (hereafter MoI). In this system children are taught in Kreol Seselwa (hereafter K.S.), the mother tongue of the vast majority, during the first two years of schooling after which it is replaced by English. Officially, K.S. retains its role as a “support language”, but in reality, controversies surround this practice. Our results indicate that while K.S. plays a central role in the everyday lives of the teachers, they are surprisingly negative to its role in education. The majority want to see it removed altogether and replaced by an English-only model. At the same time most teachers also acknowledge the importance of K.S. as a support language. Using a framework of postcolonial theory, we try to explain this inconsistency.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Norway: Fagbokforlaget, 2018. p. 129-151
Keywords [en]
Post-colonialism, Seychelles Creole (Kreol Seselwa), Second Language Medium of Instruction (L2MoI)
National Category
Languages and Literature
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147923ISBN: 9788245022599 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-147923DiVA, id: diva2:1209240
Available from: 2018-05-22 Created: 2018-05-22 Last updated: 2018-06-09

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Zelime, justinDeutschmann, Mats

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf