umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Branch Thinning and the Large-Scale, Self-Similar Structure of Trees
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics. School of Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6140-180X
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics. School of Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
Show others and affiliations
2018 (English)In: American Naturalist, ISSN 0003-0147, E-ISSN 1537-5323, Vol. 192, no 1, p. E37-E47Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Branch formation in trees has an inherent tendency toward exponential growth, but exponential growth in the number of branches cannot continue indefinitely. It has been suggested that trees balance this tendency toward expansion by also losing branches grown in previous growth cycles. Here, we present a model for branch formation and branch loss during ontogeny that builds on the phenomenological assumption of a branch carrying capacity. The model allows us to derive approximate analytical expressions for the number of tips on a branch, the distribution of growth modules within a branch, and the rate and size distribution of tree wood litter produced. Although limited availability of data makes empirical corroboration challenging, we show that our model can fit field observations of red maple (Acer rubrum) and note that the age distribution of discarded branches predicted by our model is qualitatively similar to an empirically observed distribution of dead and abscised branches of balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera). By showing how a simple phenomenological assumptionthat the number of branches a tree can maintain is limitedleads directly to predictions on branching structure and the rate and size distribution of branch loss, these results potentially enable more explicit modeling of woody tissues in ecosystems worldwide, with implications for the buildup of flammable fuel, nutrient cycling, and understanding of plant growth.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
University of Chicago Press, 2018. Vol. 192, no 1, p. E37-E47
Keywords [en]
branching structure, self-similarity, tree architecture, wood litter
National Category
Ecology Developmental Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150763DOI: 10.1086/697429ISI: 000435128300004PubMedID: 29897799OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-150763DiVA, id: diva2:1242650
Available from: 2018-08-28 Created: 2018-08-28 Last updated: 2018-08-28Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Hellström, LarsCarlsson, LinusBrännström, Åke

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Hellström, LarsCarlsson, LinusWestoby, MarkBrännström, Åke
By organisation
Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics
In the same journal
American Naturalist
EcologyDevelopmental Biology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 87 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf