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Contrasting acclimation abilities of two dominant boreal conifers to elevated CO2 and temperature
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Department of Biology and the Biotron Center for Experimental Climate Change Research, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
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2018 (English)In: Plant, Cell and Environment, ISSN 0140-7791, E-ISSN 1365-3040, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 1331-1345Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

High latitude forests will experience large changes in temperature and CO2 concentrations this century. We evaluated the effects of future climate conditions on 2 dominant boreal tree species, Pinus sylvestris L. and Picea abies (L.) H. Karst, exposing seedlings to 3 seasons of ambient (430 ppm) or elevated CO2 (750 ppm) and ambient temperatures, a + 4 degrees C warming or a + 8 degrees C warming. Pinus sylvestris responded positively to warming: seedlings developed a larger canopy, maintained high net CO2 assimilation rates (Anet), and acclimated dark respiration (Rdark). In contrast, carbon fluxes in Picea abies were negatively impacted by warming: maximum rates of Anet decreased, electron transport was redirected to alternative electron acceptors, and thermal acclimation of Rdark was weak. Elevated CO2 tended to exacerbate these effects in warm-grown Picea abies, and by the end of the experiment Picea abies from the +8 degrees C, high CO2 treatment produced fewer buds than they had 3 years earlier. Treatments had little effect on leaf and wood anatomy. Our results highlight that species within the same plant functional type may show opposite responses to warming and imply that Picea abies may be particularly vulnerable to warming due to low plasticity in photosynthetic and respiratory metabolism.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 41, no 6, p. 1331-1345
Keywords [en]
boreal forest, chlorophyll fluorescence, photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, temperature-CO2 interactions, thermal acclimation
National Category
Forest Science Botany
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150886DOI: 10.1111/pce.13158ISI: 000434162400009PubMedID: 29411877Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85044520215OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-150886DiVA, id: diva2:1243347
Available from: 2018-08-31 Created: 2018-08-31 Last updated: 2018-08-31Bibliographically approved

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Kurepin, Leonid V.Stangl, Zsofia R.Öquist, Gunnar

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Kurepin, Leonid V.Stangl, Zsofia R.Öquist, GunnarWay, DanielleHurry, Vaughan
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Department of Plant PhysiologyUmeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC)
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Plant, Cell and Environment
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