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Physical and chemical trigger factors in environmental intolerance
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5026-4934
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
2018 (English)In: International journal of hygiene and environmental health (Print), ISSN 1438-4639, E-ISSN 1618-131X, Vol. 221, no 3, p. 586-592Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Individuals with environmental intolerance (EI) react to exposure from different environmental sources at levels tolerated by most people and that are below established toxicological and hazardous thresholds. The main aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of attributing symptoms to chemical and physical sources in the environment among individuals with different forms of self-reported EI and in referents.

Methods: Cross-sectional data from a population-based study, the Västerbotten Environmental Health Study (n = 3406), were used and individuals with self-reported EI to chemicals, buildings, electromagnetic fields and sounds as well as a group with multiple EIs were identified. The Environmental-Symptom Attribution Scale was used to quantify degree to which health symptoms are attributed to 40 specific environmental exposures and sources, with subscales referring to the four types of EI.

Results: All EI groups, except the group with building related intolerance (BRI), reported more symptoms from the expected sources compared to the referents. In addition, individuals with chemical and sound intolerance reported symptoms from building related trigger factors, and individuals with electromagnetic hypersensitivity reported symptoms from chemical trigger factors.

Conclusions: The study suggests that individuals with BRI react to fewer and more specific trigger factors than do individuals with other EIs, and that it is important to ask about different sources since three of the EI groups attribute their symptoms to a wide variety of sources in addition to the sources to which their EI implicates.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018. Vol. 221, no 3, p. 586-592
Keywords [en]
Chemical intolerance, Building related intolerance, Sound intolerance, Electromagnetic hypersensitivity, Environmental risk factors, Environmental-symptom attribution scale
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151178DOI: 10.1016/j.ijheh.2018.02.009ISI: 000438327900024PubMedID: 29523399Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85042857593OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-151178DiVA, id: diva2:1245565
Available from: 2018-09-05 Created: 2018-09-05 Last updated: 2018-09-05Bibliographically approved

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Claeson, Anna-SaraPalmquist, EvaNordin, Steven

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