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Living Arrangements, Disability and Gender of Older Adults Among Rural South Africa
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. MRC/Wits Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit (Agincourt), School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; INDEPTH Network, Ghana..
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2018 (English)In: The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences, ISSN 1079-5014, E-ISSN 1758-5368, Vol. 73, no 6, p. 1112-1122Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: A limited understanding exists of the relationship between disability and older persons' living arrangements in low and middle-income countries (LMICs). We examine the associations between living arrangements, disability, and gender for individuals older than 50 years in rural South Africa.

Method: Using the Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) survey and Agincourt Health and socio-Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS) data, we explore older persons' self-reported disability by living arrangements and gender, paying particular attention to various multigenerational arrangements.

Results: Controlling for past disability status, a significant relationship between living arrangements and current disability remains, but is moderated by gender. Older persons in households where they may be more "productive" report higher levels of disability; there are fewer differences in women's than men's reported disability levels across living arrangement categories.

Discussion: This study underscores the need to examine living arrangements and disability through a gendered lens, with particular attention to heterogeneity among multigenerational living arrangements. Some living arrangements may take a greater toll on older persons than others. Important policy implications for South Africa and other LMICs emerge among vibrant debates about the role of social welfare programs in improving the health of older individuals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018. Vol. 73, no 6, p. 1112-1122
Keywords [en]
Aging, Health, Multigenerational households
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151548DOI: 10.1093/geronb/gbx081ISI: 000442312600018PubMedID: 28651372OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-151548DiVA, id: diva2:1247101
Available from: 2018-09-11 Created: 2018-09-11 Last updated: 2018-09-11Bibliographically approved

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Collinson, Mark A.

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