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Carbon Dioxide and Methane Dynamics in a Small Boreal Lake During Winter and Spring Melt Events
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5758-2705
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Biogeosciences, ISSN 2169-8953, E-ISSN 2169-8961, Vol. 123, no 8, p. 2527-2540Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In seasonally ice‐covered lakes, carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) emission at ice‐off can account for a significant fraction of the annual budget. Yet knowledge of the mechanisms controlling below lake‐ice carbon (C) dynamics and subsequent CO2 and CH4 emissions at ice‐off is limited. To understand the control of below ice C dynamics, and C emissions in spring, we measured spatial variation in CO2, CH4, and dissolved inorganic and organic carbon from ice‐on to ice‐off, in a small boreal lake during a winter with sporadic melting events. Winter melt events were associated with decreased surface water DOC in the forest‐dominated basin and increased surface water CH4 in the mire‐dominated basin. At the whole‐lake scale, CH4 accumulated below ice throughout the winter, whereas CO2 accumulation was greatest in early winter. Mass‐balance estimates suggest that, in addition to the CO2 and CH4 accumulated during winter, external inputs of CO2 and CH4 and internal processing during ice‐melt could represent significant sources of C gas emissions during ice‐off. Moreover, internal processing of CO2 and CH4 worked in opposition, with production of CO2 and oxidation of CH4 dominating at ice‐off. These findings have important implications for how small boreal lakes will respond to warmer winters in the future; increased winter melt events will likely increase external inputs below ice and thus alter the extent and timing of CO2 and CH4 emissions to the atmosphere at ice‐off.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 123, no 8, p. 2527-2540
Keywords [en]
winter limnology, carbon cycle, carbon dioxide, methane emissions, ice‐covered lake
National Category
Climate Research
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152552DOI: 10.1029/2018JG004622ISI: 000445731100016Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85052445907OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-152552DiVA, id: diva2:1255153
Available from: 2018-10-11 Created: 2018-10-11 Last updated: 2018-10-12Bibliographically approved

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Denfeld, Blaize A.Klaus, MarcusSponseller, Ryan A.Karlsson, Jan

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