umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Social Cohesion as a predictor of Self-Rated Health in adults aged 50+ in South Africa: A cross-sectional study using SAGE Wave 1 2008 secondary data
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
2018 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Aims: This study aims to test the hypothesis that social cohesion is a predictor of good self-rated health. Although there exist publications about social relationships influencing health, many of them have looked at social capital which is the social construct that looks at ‘having’. This study explores social cohesion as the social construct of ‘being’. It also explores whether marital status and residence influence social cohesion and self-rated health.

Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study using survey results from the World Health Organization (WHO) Study of Global Ageing and Adults (SAGE) Wave 1 for South Africa (2007-2008) was undertaken. Responses from 3,701 respondents were analysed using univariate and multivariate logistic regressions. The socio-demographic variables (age, gender, marital status, religion and ethnic group) were analysed in the unadjusted logistic regression and included as possible confounders in the multivariate regression. A social cohesion score was calculated for each respondent by summing responses to nine questions concerning social cohesion. A binary measure of self -rated health was derived from answers to a question which asked how the respondents rated their health on a scale of one to five. Answers ranged from very bad to very good. The multivariable regressions were stratified by marital status and place of residence.

Results: From the results, 83.6% of the respondents reported good self-rated health. Overall, 29% of the respondents reported being socially inactive,37% reported being active and 34% reported being very active. Respondents with “active” social cohesion scores had 1.29 higher odds (p<0.05, 95% CI 1.02-1.62) of reporting good health compared to the inactive group. Those who were very active had twice the odds of reporting good health compared to the inactive group after adjusting for age, residence, marital status and ethnic group. Members of the white ethnic group had more than twice higher odds of reporting good health compared to members of the black ethnic group (OR 2.62, 95% CI 1.59-4.27, p<.001). Marital status mediated the association between social cohesion and self-rated health; married people who were very socially active were more than twice as likely to have good self-rated health compared with those who were inactive, whereas their non-married counterparts who were very socially active were only one and a half times as likely to have good self-rated health. There was no statistically significant difference in the association between social cohesion and self-rated health when urban and rural residents were compared.

Discussion: Social cohesion has a positive association with self-rated health. As the age of the population increases, the odds for reporting good health decrease, and therefore there is an increased need for social, material and emotional support for them. Many countries do not have strong state social security safety nets in place for older people, and social networks can play a crucial role in providing material and psychosocial support for senior citizens.

Conclusion: Social cohesion is a predictor of self-rated health among adults aged 50+ in South Africa. The more socially active individuals are, the higher are their odds for reporting good self-rated health. Marital status modifies the association between social cohesion and self-rated health. The importance of social cohesion must be recognised and managed by governments to improve the health of their ageing populations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. , p. 27
Series
Centre for Public Health Report Series, ISSN 1651-341X ; 2018:10
Keywords [en]
Social cohesion, networks, self-rated health, ethnic group, marital status, residence Berkman framework, developing countries
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152654OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-152654DiVA, id: diva2:1256496
External cooperation
WHO SAGE - Paul Kowal
Educational program
Master's Programme in Public Health
Presentation
2018-05-22, Caring Science building, Room B302, Umeå University, Umeå, 11:00 (English)
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2018-10-22 Created: 2018-10-17 Last updated: 2018-10-22Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Kalyesubula, Allan Edward
By organisation
Epidemiology and Global Health
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 47 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf