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Vitamin D Intervention and Bone: A Randomized Clinical Trial in Fair- and Dark-skinned Children at Northern Latitudes
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 67, no 3, p. 388-394Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The aim of the study was to evaluate vitamin D status and effects of vitamin D intervention on bone mineral density (BMD) and content (BMC) in children with fair and dark skin in Sweden during winter.

Methods: In a 2-center prospective double-blinded randomized intervention study 5- to 7-year-old children (n = 206) with fair and dark skin in Sweden (55 degrees N-63 degrees N) received daily vitamin D supplements of 25 mu g, 10 mu g, or placebo (2 mu g) during 3 winter months. We measured BMD and BMC for total body (TB), total body less head (TBLH), femoral neck (FN), and spine at baseline and 4 months later. Intake of vitamin D and calcium, serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D (S-25 [OH]D), and related parameters were analyzed.

Results: Despite lower S-25(OH)D in dark than fair-skinned children, BMD of TB (P = 0.012) and TBLH (P = 0.002) and BMC of TBLH (P = 0.04) were higher at baseline and follow-up in those with dark skin. Delta (Delta) BMD and BMC of TB and TBLH did not differ between intervention and placebo groups, but FN-BMC increased more among dark-skinned children in the 25 mu g (P = 0.038) and 10 mu g (P = 0.027) groups compared to placebo. We found no associations between Delta S-25(OH)D, P-parathyroid hormone, P-alkaline phosphatase, and Delta BMD and BMC, respectively.

Conclusions: BMD and BMC remained higher in dark- than fair-skinned children despite lower vitamin D status. Even though no difference in general was found in BMD or BMC after vitamin D intervention, the increase in FN-BMC in dark-skinned children may suggest an influence on bone in those with initially insufficient vitamin D status.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2018. Vol. 67, no 3, p. 388-394
Keywords [en]
bone mineral content, bone mineral density, child, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, skin color
National Category
Orthopaedics Pediatrics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152216DOI: 10.1097/MPG.0000000000002031ISI: 000442252100024PubMedID: 29851760OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-152216DiVA, id: diva2:1258730
Available from: 2018-10-25 Created: 2018-10-25 Last updated: 2018-10-25Bibliographically approved

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Lind, TorbjörnHernell, OlleSilfverdal, Sven-ArneÖhlund, Inger

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