umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The impact of spoken action words on performance in a cross-modal oddball task
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. School of Psychology, Cardiff University, United Kingdom.
2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 11, article id e0207852Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study a cross-modal oddball task was employed to study the effect that words spoken either non-urgently or urgently would have on a digit categorization task and if women would exhibit greater behavioral inhibitory control. The words were unrelated to the task itself, but related to the action required to complete the task. Forty participants (21 women) conducted a computerized categorization task while exposed to a sinewave tone as a standard stimulus (75% of the trials) or a to-be ignored word (press, stop) spoken either non-urgently or urgently as unexpected auditory deviant stimulus (6.25% trials for each category). Urgent words had sharp intonation and an average fundamental frequency (F0) ranging from 191.9 (stop) to 204.6 (press) Hz. Non-urgent words had low intonation with average F0 ranging from 103.9.9 (stop) to 120.3 (press) Hz. As expected, deviant distraction and longer response times were found by exposure to the word stop, but deviant distraction was not found to be significant with the word press or due to intonation. While the results showed that women had in general longer reaction times, there were no gender differences found related to the deviant distraction caused by word or intonation. The present results do not support the hypothesis that women have greater behavioral inhibitory control, but there was evidence that the meaning of the word could influence response times.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 13, no 11, article id e0207852
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153436DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0207852ISI: 000450775300049PubMedID: 30458043OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-153436DiVA, id: diva2:1264728
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2011-1782Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2211-0505Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2014.0205Available from: 2018-11-21 Created: 2018-11-21 Last updated: 2018-12-19Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(1385 kB)99 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 1385 kBChecksum SHA-512
da3f79a6c67153835613fb4a93d9d563d10653114f17eb6fc3ee16e42f9200068cd31bbabcd5e8a45edbd1d8ffbe985549f94b754a79ca38f5548012553794c8
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Neely, GregoryEriksson Sörman, DanielLjungberg, Jessica K.

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Neely, GregoryEriksson Sörman, DanielLjungberg, Jessica K.
By organisation
Department of Psychology
In the same journal
PLoS ONE
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 99 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 164 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf