umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Effects of large herbivores on tundra vegetation in a changing climate, and implications for rewilding
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6943-1218
2018 (English)In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8436, E-ISSN 1471-2970, Vol. 373, no 1761, article id 20170437Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In contrast to that of the Pleistocene epoch, between approximately 2.6 million and 10 000 years before present, the extant community of large herbivores in Arctic tundra is species-poor predominantly due to human extinctions. We here discuss how this species-poor herbivore guild influences tundra ecosystems, especially in relation to the rapidly changing climate. We show that present herbivore assemblages have large effects on tundra ecosystem composition and function and suggest that the effect on thermophilic species expected to invade the tundra in a warmer climate is especially strong, and that herbivores slow ecosystem responses to climate change. We focus on the ability of herbivores to drive transitions between different vegetation states. One such transition is between tundra and forest. A second vegetation transition discussed is between grasslands and moss-and shrub-dominated tundra. Contemporary studies show that herbivores can drive such state shifts and that a more diverse herbivore assemblage would have even higher potential to do so. We conclude that even though many large herbivores, and especially the megaherbivores, are extinct, there is a potential to reintroduce large herbivores in many arctic locations, and that doing so would potentially reduce some of the unwanted effects of a warmer climate. This article is part of the theme issue 'Trophic rewilding: consequences for ecosystems under global change'.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The Royal Society , 2018. Vol. 373, no 1761, article id 20170437
Keywords [en]
herbivory, climate change, state shifts, treeline shifts, mammoth steppe, rewilding
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153631DOI: 10.1098/rstb.2017.0437ISI: 000449344900005PubMedID: 30348880OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-153631DiVA, id: diva2:1266124
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-04515Available from: 2018-11-27 Created: 2018-11-27 Last updated: 2018-11-27Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Olofsson, Johan

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Olofsson, Johan
By organisation
Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences
In the same journal
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences
Ecology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 71 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf