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“We are alive but not living…”: - experiences of Afghan Unaccompanied asylum-seeking children on stressors and coping resources of asylum
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
2018 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Unaccompanied Asylum-seeking children are a vulnerable population that have higher risks of developing mental health disorders such as anxiety, depression, emotional problems and PTSD. These problems are associated with complexity of stressors and factors from all three stages of the journey, pre-flight, flight and post-flight. This study aims to understand the perception of stressors of the asylum process and the coping resources among Afghan unaccompanied asylum-seeking children.

Methods: A qualitative design was used in this study. Six semi-structured interviews were carried out with young Afghan asylum seekers in different stages of asylum process in a medium sized city of Sweden. The interviews were informed by Stress and coping theory by Lazarus and Folkman. The data was analysed using qualitative content analysis.

Results: The study findings showed that learning a new language, adapting a new culture, discrimination and uncertainty during the long asylum process were the main stressors affecting the well-being of UASC. On the other hand, physical and social activities, faith and social support were resources that helps them to cope with the stressors of asylum.

Conclusions: Among the perceived stressors, uncertainty of the future due to long asylum process was perceived to have the most effect on the mental health of these UASC. Thus, decreasing the uncertainty via shortening the waiting time for a decision could help beneficial for the UASC’s well-being. On the other hand, social support was perceived as the most important coping resource, thus prioritizing intervention that aims to increases the social support and integration in the Swedish society could also beneficial for this vulnerable population.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. , p. 36
Series
Centre for Public Health Report Series, ISSN 1651-341X ; 2018:50
Keywords [en]
Afghan, unaccompanied asylum-seeking children, experinces on stressors, coping resources of asylum
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153754OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-153754DiVA, id: diva2:1266793
External cooperation
Vän i Umeå
Educational program
Master's Programme in Public Health
Presentation
2018-10-18, Lecture room Alicante, Building 5B, Floor 3, Epidemiology and Global Health, Umeå University, Umeå, 14:00 (English)
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2018-11-29 Created: 2018-11-29 Last updated: 2018-11-29Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf