umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Deliberate self-harm and ethnicity in the city of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
2015 (English)In: Suicidology Online, ISSN 2078-5488, E-ISSN 2078-5488, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the present study is to investigate deliberate self-harm (DSH) in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH), with special reference to gender, age and ethnicity. Between 2001 and 2003, known hospital cases of DSH in persons aged 15 or older in the Sarajevo area were monitored using standardised methods. In total, 1428 DSH events were registered, giving an annual mean DSH event rate of 119 per 100 000 (118 for women, 120 for men) and a DSH person rate of 110 (108 for women, 111 for men). The mean person-based DSH rate was 124 for Bosniaks (Muslims), 128 for Croats (Catolics), and 88 for Serbs (Orthodox Christians). Self-poisoning was the most commonly used method in all three ethnic groups (66%), with second-most common method self-harm by a sharp object (17%). A very low proportion used guns or explosives. The rates of DSH in Sarajevo during the study period were comparable to those of many other regions in Europe, though with a quite unique pattern of higher rates among men. We identified fluctuating but significantly not different rates between ethnic groups. The general belief that religious denomination is decisive for level of DSH-rates was not supported by the findings of this study; rather the post-war situation with huge demographic changes was reflected in the results. Disruptions to social integration as a consequence of the war are put forward as possible explanations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
University of Molise , 2015. Vol. 6, no 1, p. 1-6
Keywords [en]
Sarajevo, DSH, gender, ethnicity, post-war period 2001-2003
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153863ISI: 000438590500002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-153863DiVA, id: diva2:1268275
Available from: 2018-12-05 Created: 2018-12-05 Last updated: 2018-12-05Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

URL

Authority records BETA

Music, EminaSalander Renberg, Ellinor

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Music, EminaSalander Renberg, Ellinor
By organisation
Psychiatry
In the same journal
Suicidology Online
Psychiatry

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 34 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf