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Long-term air pollution exposure is associated with sick leave 20 years later
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2018 (English)In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 52Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Little is known on outdoor air pollution in a long-term perspective and societal costs such as sick leave. In the Nordic countries, recent pollution health impact assessments have had to rely on outdated studies.

Aims: To investigate if air pollution exposure is associated with sick leave 20 years later.

Methods: We analysed self-reported sick leave (all-cause and respiratory) in 7 466 subjects from Bergen, Gothenburg, Umea, Uppsala in the RHINE3 study in 2010-12. Home addresses were geocoded and linked to annual average concentrations of PM2.5, PM10 and NO2 at RHINE3, 10 years earlier and 20 years earlier, using existing land-use regression (LUR) models. We performed multilevel logistic regression clustered by centre, and adjusted for sex, smoking, education and previous health-related workplace change.

Results: Age range in RHINE3 was 40-66 yrs, 34% and 4% reported all-cause and respiratory sick leave during the last year. In the adjusted analyses all-cause sick leave was associated with PM2.520 years earlier (OR per interquartile range (IQR) difference (2.6 µg/m³) 1.12 (95%CI 1.01, 1.24)), and borderline with NO2 (OR per IQR diff (8.1 µg/m³) 1.09 (95%CI 0.99, 1.19)). Respiratory sick leave was associated with PM10 20 years earlier (OR per IQR diff (3.92 µg/m³) 1.54 (95%CI 1.06, 2.25)), and borderline with PM2.5 (OR per IQR diff 1.31 (95%CI 0.97, 1.76)). Pollution exposures at present as well as 10 years earlier were not significantly associated with sick leave.

Conclusions: Air pollution exposure in a general population is associated with sick leave in a 20-year perspective. Our findings suggest that even low air pollution levels such as in Northern Europe have societal costs over time.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
European Respiratory Society , 2018. Vol. 52
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156006DOI: 10.1183/13993003.congress-2018.OA5182ISI: 000455567100479OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-156006DiVA, id: diva2:1284704
Conference
28th International Congress of the European-Respiratory-Society (ERS), SEP 15-19, 2018, Paris, FRANCE
Note

Supplement: 62

Meeting Abstract: OA5182

Available from: 2019-02-01 Created: 2019-02-01 Last updated: 2019-02-01Bibliographically approved

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Forsberg, Bertil

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