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Inter-Institutional Collaboration in Doctoral Education – the Umeå Experience
Umeå University. Industrial Doctoral School.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0673-9984
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Industrial Doctoral School (IDS) at Umeå University has so far engaged 51 researchers together with 47 partners in 66 projects. Ten of these projects collaborate with external research institutes and for this presentation, three supervisors responded. This presentation will, by using a SWOT, focus on how our researchers looks upon Inter-Institutional Collaboration. What are the strengths and weaknesses, opportunities and threats and how can we make the most out of these collaborations in order to foster the next generation of researchers?

Regarding strengths the researchers do refer to existing research infra structure, knowledge in and awareness of research methods and research in general. Inter-Institutional Collaboration gives a possibility to work with non-academic colleagues who are well orientated in terminology, methodology and common research issues. This reduces friction that is normally expected from a new collaboration. These colleagues come with a stimulating and inspiring environment. Often the doctoral candidate will end up as an employee at the institute. It is of huge importance for the university to be provider of qualified and competent co-workers.

Weaknesses are pointed out being connected to organizational issues such as a conflict between the long-term scientific interest of the university and the need for immediate progress at the institute. This is mostly solved by negotiations, discussions on what projects to pursue and what efforts to prioritize. Another issue that is brought up from a very specific case, is the lack of input from a more general research environment if the candidate spend most of the time at the institute.

Opportunities highlighted by our researchers show the strengths of this form of collaboration in doctoral education. Among the opportunities are new techniques and novel ideas that are synonymous for good results. It gives the doctoral candidates, and of course the university, access to a wider network of researchers. Inter-Institutional Collaboration could often introduce conferences, journals, funding agencies etc. that might be new to academia. Publishing results together with established researchers both within the university as well as at the institute is another opportunity. The Inter-Institutional Collaboration helps not only to establish but to enforce networks and contacts, pointing to the direction of new research projects.

Obviously our researchers identified threats with this type of collaboration. One mentioned is a more rapid change in organization at the institute. Funding schemes might run over a shorter time, which can cause tension. The rules and regulation of the institute might be more rigid and leaves less freedom to the researcher/candidate. In order to avoid or at least diminish friction, frequent communication is very important. By continuous updating each other on all changes you can ensure that collaboration is running smooth.

The answers given could serve as indication that Inter-Institutional Collaboration within doctoral education is positive and useful for all involved, the supervisor, the candidate and the research institute. Collaboration seem to foster competitive new researchers, add value to research both at the institute and at the university and secure the future need for well-educated staff.

IDS at Umeå University started the first cohort in 2008. Six cohorts have been started since and 51 researchers have been engaged in 66 projects with 47 partners. IDS is a multidisciplinary doctoral education and each candidate is working together with an external partner in their doctoral education. IDS has a biannual intake and accepts up to 16 candidates per cohort. The resources are distributed after an assessment by the IDS steering committee.

As an outcome of the EUA-project DOC-CAREERS II, Umeå University established European Industrial Doctoral School (E.I.D.S.) together with Bangor University, UK, Gent University Belgium. A few years later, University of Pardubice, Czech Republic and University of Aveiro, Portugal joined E.I.D.S. The main task for E.I.D.S. is to give an annual workshop for doctoral candidates engaged in collaborative doctoral education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019.
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157015OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-157015DiVA, id: diva2:1293855
Conference
2019 EUA-CDE THEMATIC WORKSHOP Inter-institutional Collaboration in Doctoral Education, Amsterdam, 17-18 January
Available from: 2019-03-05 Created: 2019-03-05 Last updated: 2019-03-14Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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