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Repeated evolutionary transitions of flavobacteria from marine to non-marine habitats
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2019 (English)In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 648-666Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The taxonomy of marine and non-marine organisms rarely overlap, but the mechanisms underlying this distinction are often unknown. Here, we predicted three major ocean-to-land transitions in the evolutionary history of Flavobacteriaceae, a family known for polysaccharide and peptide degradation. These unidirectional transitions were associated with repeated losses of marine signature genes and repeated gains of non-marine adaptive genes. This included various Na+-dependent transporters, osmolyte transporters and glycoside hydrolases (GH) for sulfated polysaccharide utilization in marine descendants, and in non-marine descendants genes for utilizing the land plant material pectin and genes facilitating terrestrial host interactions. The K+ scavenging ATPase was repeatedly gained whereas the corresponding low-affinity transporter repeatedly lost upon transitions, reflecting K+ ions are less available to non-marine bacteria. Strikingly, the central metabolism Na+-translocating NADH: quinone dehydrogenase gene was repeatedly gained in marine descendants, whereas the H+-translocating counterpart was repeatedly gained in non-marine lineages. Furthermore, GH genes were depleted in isolates colonizing animal hosts but abundant in bacteria inhabiting other non-marine niches; thus relative abundances of GH versus peptidase genes among Flavobacteriaceae lineages were inconsistent with the marine versus non-marine dichotomy. We suggest that phylogenomic analyses can cast novel light on mechanisms explaining the distribution and ecology of key microbiome components.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019. Vol. 21, no 2, p. 648-666
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157404DOI: 10.1111/1462-2920.14509ISI: 000459172700011PubMedID: 30565818OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-157404DiVA, id: diva2:1297122
Available from: 2019-03-19 Created: 2019-03-19 Last updated: 2019-03-20Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
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  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
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  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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  • asciidoc
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