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PREVIOUSLY IDENTIFIED COMMON GLIOMA RISK SNPs ARE ASSOCIATED WITH FAMILIAL GLIOMA
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2018 (English)In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 20, p. 108-108Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Approximately 5% of gliomas occur in individuals with a family history of glioma, and first-degree relatives of brain tumor cases have a two-fold increase in risk of brain tumor. Family-based studies have had little success in identifying high penetrance risk variants. Recent somatic characterization has shown that tumors from familial cases are indistinguishable from sporadic cases, suggesting that familial cases may arise through similar mechanisms of gliomagenesis, and therefore may be associated with common variants as well as rare mutations. In this analysis, we assessed whether previously identified common risk variants are associated with familial glioma.  METHODS: Data were obtained from the Glioma International Case Control (GICC) Study for 447 familial cases and 3,286 controls. We assessed 25 risk loci previously identified by glioma GWAS, and odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were calculated using an additive genetic logistic regression model adjusted for age, sex, and the first principal component. Results were considered significant at p TERT, EGFR, CCDC26, CDKN2B, TP53, and RTEL1. The strongest association was at rs55705857 (CCDC26, OR=2.5, p=1.14x10-14). These SNPs were further examined using a caseonly approach comparing familial to non-familial cases, and there was no significant difference in allele frequencies by family history status. CONCLUSIONS: In this analysis we identified a significant association between familial glioma and six common risk variants previously identified by glioma GWAS. This provides further evidence of shared pathways of genetic risk and gliomagenesis between familial and non-familial glioma. Further exploration is necessary to determine the overall contribution of common genetic variation to risk of familial glioma.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC , 2018. Vol. 20, p. 108-108
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157543ISI: 000460646300451OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-157543DiVA, id: diva2:1299035
Conference
23rd Annual Scientific Meeting and Education Day of the Society-for-Neuro-Oncology (SNO) / 3rd CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development Conference, NOV 14-18, 2018, New Orleans, LA
Available from: 2019-03-26 Created: 2019-03-26 Last updated: 2019-03-26Bibliographically approved

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Melin, Beatrice S.

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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