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Inequalities in determinants and mental health in Sweden: results from a governmental initiative
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health. Public Health Agency of Sweden, Solna, Sweden.
2018 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 28, p. 124-124Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Mental health is an increasing concern in all European countries. Social inequalities may appear both in the distribution of mental health and the social and economic consequences. In 2016, the government commissioned The Public Health Agency of Sweden (PHAS) to increase knowledge on socioeconomic determinants of mental health problems. The present study addresses the social distribution of mental health problems and what mediates this.

Drawing on patient registry data of the population from 2014 and a national survey representative of the population aged 16-84, years 2013-2016 (n = 155339) we analyze how mental health is distributed in social groups and what determinants mediate poor mental health. Outcomes include psychiatric in- and outpatient care (numbers and cases/1000), and for self-reported measures (ie. GHQ, stress, anxiety) odds ratios (OR) from multivariate logistic regression, adjusting for social and economic determinants.

Preliminary results show that most outcomes in self-reported poor mental health and psychiatric diagnoses were more common among women. Social patterns differed between diagnoses.

Among working ages in- and outpatient care, low educated showed fourfold increased risk of psychotic disorders, while neurotic stress related disorders showed a doubled risk among low educated. Care for any mental disorder (excluding dementia) was more common among lower educated men and women aged 65+ but had a reverse social gradient. In analyses modelling the risk of poor mental health (GHQ12), controlling for background-, social and economic factors in particular financial strain (OR 2.42, CI 2.11-2.77) mediated poor mental health among women 25-64.

An educational gradient was found in most mental health outcomes with more pronounced gradient in more severe outcomes. Patterns differ by age groups, social group, and outcome. Results will be used to inform practitioners and policy makers at national and regional level to decrease inequalities in mental health.

Key messages:

  • Social inequalities in mental health and its’ determinants are found in most age groups, and most outcomes studied.

  • Focusing on living conditions, particularly economic strain is essential for achieving equity in mental health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018. Vol. 28, p. 124-124
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157984DOI: 10.1093/eurpub/cky213.363ISI: 000461384200300OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-157984DiVA, id: diva2:1303200
Conference
11th European Public Health Conference Winds of change: towards new ways of improving public health in Europe Ljubljana, Slovenia, 28 November–1 December, 2018.
Note

Supplement 4

Available from: 2019-04-09 Created: 2019-04-09 Last updated: 2019-04-09Bibliographically approved

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Trygg, Nadja

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