umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Sex-specific gene and pathway modeling of inherited glioma risk
Show others and affiliations
2019 (English)In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 71-82Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background To date, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 25 risk variants for glioma, explaining 30% of heritable risk. Most histologies occur with significantly higher incidence in males, and this difference is not explained by currently known risk factors. A previous GWAS identified sex-specific glioma risk variants, and this analysis aims to further elucidate risk variation by sex using gene- and pathway-based approaches. Methods Results from the Glioma International Case-Control Study were used as a testing set, and results from 3 GWAS were combined via meta-analysis and used as a validation set. Using summary statistics for nominally significant autosomal SNPs (P < 0.01 in a previous meta-analysis) and nominally significant X-chromosome SNPs (P < 0.01), 3 algorithms (Pascal, BimBam, and GATES) were used to generate gene scores, and Pascal was used to generate pathway scores. Results were considered statistically significant in the discovery set when P < 3.3 x 10(-6) and in the validation set when P < 0.001 in 2 of 3 algorithms. Results Twenty-five genes within 5 regions and 19 genes within 6 regions reached statistical significance in at least 2 of 3 algorithms in males and females, respectively. EGFR was significantly associated with all glioma and glioblastoma in males only and a female-specific association in TERT, all of which remained nominally significant after conditioning on known risk loci. There were nominal associations with the BioCarta telomeres pathway in both males and females. Conclusions These results provide additional evidence that there may be differences by sex in genetic risk for glioma. Additional analyses may further elucidate the biological processes through which this risk is conferred.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019. Vol. 21, no 1, p. 71-82
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Medical Genetics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158124DOI: 10.1093/neuonc/noy135ISI: 000462586300009PubMedID: 30124908OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-158124DiVA, id: diva2:1304417
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Cancer SocietyNIH (National Institute of Health), R01CA139020NIH (National Institute of Health), R01CA52689NIH (National Institute of Health), P50CA097257NIH (National Institute of Health), R01CA126831Available from: 2019-04-12 Created: 2019-04-12 Last updated: 2019-04-12Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Andersson, UlrikaMelin, Beatrice S.

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Andersson, UlrikaMelin, Beatrice S.Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.
By organisation
Department of Radiation Sciences
In the same journal
Neuro-Oncology
Cancer and OncologyMedical Genetics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 29 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf