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Mid-calf skeletal muscle density and its associations with accelerometer-determined physical activity, bone health and incident 12-month falls in older adults: the healthy ageing initiative
Umeå University.
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2019 (English)In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 30, p. S59-S59Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To determine associations of mid-calf muscle density, an indicator of intramuscular fat infiltration, with objectively-determined physical activity, bone health and 12-month falls risk in community-dwelling older adults.

Methods: 2167 community-dwelling Swedish men and women who participated in the Healthy Ageing Initiative study at age 70 were included in this analysis. Mid-calf muscle density (mg/cm3; higher values indicate lower intramuscular fat content) at the proximal tibia, and bone parameters at the distal and proximal tibia and radius, were assessed by peripheral quantitative computed tomography. Whole-body lean and fat mass, lumbar spine and total hip BMD were assessed by DXA. Participants completed the timed up-and-go (TUG) test, 7-day accelerometer measurements of physical activity intensity, and self-reported falls data were collected 6 and 12 months later.

Results: Only moderate/vigorous intensity physical activity, not sedentary or light activity, was positively associated with mid-calf muscle density (B=0.002 mg/cm3 per minute; P<0.001). 258 (12%) participants experienced a fall within 12 months. After adjustment for confounders including sex, fasting glucose, average daily moderate/vigorous intensity physical activity, and total lean mass at baseline, each mg/cm3 increase in mid-calf muscle density was associated with 4% and 11% reduced likelihood of experiencing a fall or multiple falls, respectively (both P<0.05). The association with multiple falls remained significant after further adjustment for TUG time (OR: 0.91 95%CI: 0.83, 0.99). In multivariable models, mid-calf muscle density was not associated with total hip BMD, was negatively associated with lumbar spine BMD (B=-0.003, 95%CI -0.005, -0.003 g/cm2), and at the radius, was positively associated only with proximal cortical density (B=0.784, 95%CI 0.246, 1.323 mg/cm3). However, at the tibia, muscle density was positively associated with distal total and trabecular BMD, and also proximal total and cortical BMD, cortical thickness and stress-strain index (all P<0.05).

Conclusions: Higher mid-calf muscle density is independently associated with decreased likelihood for multiple incident falls and appears to have localised positive effects on bone structure. Improvements in lower-limb muscle density may be achievable through increasing participation in moderate/vigorous intensity activity and could potentially reduce fracture risk in older adults.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019. Vol. 30, p. S59-S59
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-160305DOI: 10.1007/s00198-018-04815-5ISI: 000469495000068OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-160305DiVA, id: diva2:1325860
Conference
IOF-Regional 7th Asia-Pacific Osteoporosis Conference, Sydney, AUSTRALIA, NOV 29-DEC 01, 2018
Note

Supplement: 1

Available from: 2019-06-17 Created: 2019-06-17 Last updated: 2019-06-17Bibliographically approved

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