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Action planning in relation to movement performance in 6-year-old children with autism spectrum disorder
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
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2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Recent research proposes problems with action planning as part of atypical motor functioning in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), although findings are inconsistent. This study investigated relations between action planning and movement performance in 6-year-old children with and without ASD.

Patients and methods: 3D kinematic recordings of preferred arm/hand performance on a sequential peg rotation task with varying complexity of goal insertion (four endpoints and either visual or occluded goal display at onset) were conducted in 6 children with ASD (MAge = 6.4) and 6 typically developing (TD) controls (MAge = 6.5).

Results: Analyses revealed significant (p < .05) group and task-endpoint differences for movement segmentation (number of movement units, MUs) and 3D movement distance. Children with ASD generally displayed more MUs and longer distances than controls and all children showed increased MUs and movement distance on more complex task-endpoints. TD controls showed significantly shorter movement initiation latency (MIL) durations than ASD in the visual condition and evidently longer MILs in the occluded than visual condition. In contrast, no difference between goal display conditions was shown for the ASD group.

Conclusion: Children with ASD generally had longer movement distances and more segmented movements than controls, suggesting less efficient movement performance. Movement performance was not evidently affected by goal display condition in either group. However, the lack of MIL differences between goal display conditions within the ASD group indicates reduced pre-planning, possibly affecting movement execution efficiency.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019.
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-160514OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-160514DiVA, id: diva2:1327422
Conference
31st Annual Meeting of the European Academy of Childhood Disability, Paris, France, May 23-25 2019
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2015.0192Available from: 2019-06-19 Created: 2019-06-19 Last updated: 2019-07-29Bibliographically approved

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Bäckström, AnnaJohansson, Anna-MariaRönnqvist, LouiseDomellöf, Erik

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf