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In Search of Digital Feminisms: Digital Gender & Aesthetic technology
Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of Creative Studies (Teacher Education).
2013 (English)In: Lateral: Journal of the Cultural Studies Association, ISSN 2469-4053, no 2Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

What is it that influences girls’ choices of new technology? How is digital creativity affected by gender norms? “Digital Gender & Aesthetic Technology” aims to make visible females as creative developers of the Internet and new technology, through interviews with students, artists, project managers, and entrepreneurs. The prevailing social norms appear to be reflected on the Internet as “digital gender norms,” where girls and boys prefer apparently different communication tools. While working with the question of “digital gender,” I have developed the hypothesis of “Aesthetic Technology,” namely that girls often have an artistic approach towards technology. Girls mainly learn technology for a personal reason, planning to create something once they have learned the technique, and their goal often have aesthetic preferences. The question of girls “becoming technical,” is more complicated than one might first think, in relation to gender. Even though young girls are often just as interested in technology as young boys are, it is difficult for them to keep or adapt their technical interest to normative femininity in their teens. Another problem is that expressions of technical competence or innovation, which do not correspond to the predominant male norm, might be hard to recognize. Females who study within the field of creative digital technology often begin their career by struggling with questions of equality, instead of just practicing their profession.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. no 2
National Category
Gender Studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-160519DOI: 10.25158/L2.1.6OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-160519DiVA, id: diva2:1327457
Available from: 2019-06-19 Created: 2019-06-19 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved

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Morén, Sol

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