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The invisible girl
Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of Creative Studies (Teacher Education).
2012 (English)Artistic output (Refereed)
Resource type
Still image
Physical description [en]

Digitally edited photograph

Description [en]

This artwork was made especially for the Invisible Girl Project, with support from the Swedish artist foundation KC Nord. The photograph was arranged and taken at the archepelago of Stockholm during the summer of 2011, in cooperation with Hanna Persson, who acts as a model in the picture.

Abstract [en]

Entering a new world, in order not to fade away or become invisible, you must have the courage to start making at least a small part of the new world yours. When the little girl who is the the main character in the fairytale anime Spirited Away, becomes transluctant, she eats some berries from the alien world, to slowly become visible again. When I found out that the research project Invisible Girl was open for visual arts, I immediately visualized the image of the invisible girl. In my artistic practice the embodied vision often appears first, of course not in a void, but solitary, and the background, the artistic sources of inspiration or references has to be traced back subsequently. One comprehension of the artistic vision is that it arises from a specific approach to creativity, in which the unconscious is allowed to penetrate to the surface. During the artistic process, I think in images, words represent themselves as pictures, or associations to other words that become other images. In my artistic vision I saw the picture of a girl whose hands and feet had already started to fade away, as she was slowly becoming more and more translucent. In the beginning of the tale, a symbolic dark tunnel leads the family into an unfamiliar world, or to use Freud's term uncanny, populated by spirits. To understand the changes taking place in her life the little girl examines and develops the various possible charaters or selves that reveals themselves to her in the fairytale. According traditional psychoanalysis, fairytales could serve as metaphors that may help children to relate to different problems or transitional phases of life. The artwork Invisible Girl symbolizes the transition between worlds, old and new selves, or one could say, a rite de passage.

Place, publisher, year, pages
Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2012.
Publication channel
Invisible Girl Anthology / [ed] Gun-Marie Frånberg, Elza Dunkels and Camilla Hällgren, Umeå: Umeå Universitet, 2012
National Category
Visual Arts
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-160523ISBN: 9789174597271 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-160523DiVA, id: diva2:1327505
Note

Theme II: Bodily Existence, Chapter 11, page 101

Available from: 2019-06-19 Created: 2019-06-19 Last updated: 2019-06-20Bibliographically approved

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Morén, Sol

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Total: 13 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf