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Age- and gender-specific incidence of new asthma diagnosis from childhood to late adulthood
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2019 (English)In: Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 0954-6111, E-ISSN 1532-3064, Vol. 154, p. 56-62Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Asthma is currently divided into different phenotypes, with age at onset as a relevant differentiating factor. In addition, asthma with onset in adulthood seems to have a poorer prognosis, but studies investigating age-specific incidence of asthma with a wide age span are scarce.

Objective: To evaluate incidence of asthma diagnosis at different ages and differences between child- and adult-diagnosed asthma in a large population-based study, with gender-specific analyzes included.

Methods: In 2016, a respiratory questionnaire was sent to 8000 randomly selected subjects aged 20-69 years in western Finland. After two reminders, 4173 (52.3%) subjects responded. Incidence rate of asthma was retrospectively estimated based on the reported age of asthma onset. Adult-diagnosed asthma was defined as a physician-diagnosis of asthma made at >= 18 years of age.

Results: Among those with physician-diagnosed asthma, altogether, 63.7% of subjects, 58.4% of men and 67.8% of women, reported adult-diagnosed asthma. Incidence of asthma diagnosis was calculated in 10-year age groups and it peaked in young boys (0-9 years) and middle-aged women (40-49 years) and the average incidence rate during the examined period between 1946 and 2015 was 2.2/1000/year. Adult-diagnosed asthma became the dominant phenotype among those with physician-diagnosed asthma by age of 50 years and 38 years in men and women, respectively.

Conclusions: Asthma is mainly diagnosed during adulthood and the incidence of asthma diagnosis peaks in middle-aged women. Asthma diagnosed in adulthood should be considered more in clinical practice and management guidelines.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019. Vol. 154, p. 56-62
Keywords [en]
Asthma, Incidence, Prevalence, Gender, Adult, Phenotype
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161842DOI: 10.1016/j.rmed.2019.06.003ISI: 000474821800009PubMedID: 31212122OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-161842DiVA, id: diva2:1341405
Available from: 2019-08-08 Created: 2019-08-08 Last updated: 2019-08-08Bibliographically approved

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Backman, HelenaRönmark, Eva

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Hisinger-Molkanen, HannaIlmarinen, PinjaBackman, HelenaRönmark, Eva
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