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Groundwater inflows control patterns and sources of greenhouse gas emissions from streams
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4391-7399
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2019 (English)In: Limnology and Oceanography, ISSN 0024-3590, E-ISSN 1939-5590, Vol. 64, no 4, p. 1545-1557Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Headwater streams can be important sources of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) to the atmosphere. However, the influence of groundwater-stream connectivity on the patterns and sources of carbon (C) gas evasion is still poorly understood. We explored these connections in the boreal landscape through a detailed study of a 1.4 km lake outlet stream that is hydrologically fed by multiple topographically driven groundwater input zones. We measured stream and groundwater dissolved organic C (DOC), CO2, and CH4 concentrations every 50 m biweekly during the ice-free period and estimated in-stream C gas production through a mass balance model and independent estimates of aquatic metabolism. The spatial pattern of C gas concentrations was consistent over time, with peaks of both CH4 and CO2 concentrations occurring after each groundwater input zone. Moreover, lateral C gas inputs from riparian soils were the major source of CO2 and CH4 to the stream. DOC mineralization and CH4 oxidation within the stream accounted for 17-51% of stream CO2 emissions, and this contribution was the greatest during relatively higher flows. Overall, our results illustrate how the nature and arrangement of groundwater flowpaths can organize patterns of stream C concentrations, transformations, and emissions by acting as a direct source of gases and by supplying organic substrates that fuel aquatic metabolism. Hence, refined assessments of how catchment structure influences the timing and magnitude of groundwater-stream connections are crucial for mechanistically understanding and scaling C evasion rates from headwaters.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 64, no 4, p. 1545-1557
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161831DOI: 10.1002/lno.11134ISI: 000474301200009OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-161831DiVA, id: diva2:1342103
Available from: 2019-08-12 Created: 2019-08-12 Last updated: 2019-08-12Bibliographically approved

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Denfeld, Blaize A.Karlsson, JanSponseller, Ryan A.

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  • apa
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  • de-DE
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