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Government policy for indigenous (Sámi) sport – A chain of legitimating acts?
Norway inland university of applied sciences; Norway.
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2745-4841
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9619-801x
Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Norway.
2019 (English)In: Book of Abstracts for the World Congress of Sociology of Sport, Dunedin, New Zealand, 2019Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

When Norwegian state policy repeatedly abandons the organization of indigenous (Sámi) sport (SVL-N) in order to honour the implicit contract with the organization of conventional (Norwegian sport, NIF), six elements of legitimating acts are in play: legitimacy-seeking organisation, subject, sources, strategy, bases and scenario. These elements intersect within each phase of the policy process: agenda setting, policy formulation, policy implementation and evaluation. As visible when focusing on the legitimacy-seeking organization and subject, the goal for sport clubs is, to legitimate themselves, and providing support to sport is a core task of local authorities. So when municipalities and local NIF federated sport clubs legitimate each other, Sámi sport organizations are excluded from the legitimating chain. Focusing on a national example, youth sport is both a subject, and it is a strategy used by NIF to legitimate implementation of other policies such as supporting and arranging mega events. When substantial strategies are coupled with symbolic strategies, the risk for so-called ceremonial conformity decoupling is immanent. In conclusion, consequences—often unintended—resulting from legitimating acts in one phase have legitimacy-related implications for other phases of the policy process. That said, being included in the chain is the core issue to receive economic support for sport. Consequently, a newcomer such as the SVL-N struggles to set itself on the agenda of sport policy because acts in other phases consciously legitimate the NIF structure and its member organizations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019.
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163359OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-163359DiVA, id: diva2:1351675
Conference
World Congress of Sociology of Sport 2019 April 24–27 2019, Dunedin, New Zealand.
Available from: 2019-09-16 Created: 2019-09-16 Last updated: 2019-09-16

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Fahlén, JosefStenling, Cecilia

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf