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Self and Informant Memory Reports in FINGER: Associations with Two-Year Cognitive Change
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 71, no 3, p. 785-795Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Subjective memory complaints (SMCs) may be the first sign of cognitive decline in aging. Objective: To examine whether SMCs reported by oneself and informant predict cognitive change over 2 years among at-risk elderly people, and to determine the relationship of different types of SMCs (prospective and retrospective memory complaints) and change in cognitive function. Methods: This investigation is part of the FINGER project, which is a multicenter randomized controlled trial aiming at preventing cognitive decline in cognitively healthy older adults with increased risk of dementia. A subsample of 303 controlgroup participants (aged 60-80 years) and their informants (n = 261) rated the frequency of SMCs, using the Prospective and Retrospective Memory Questionnaire (PRMQ). Cognitive performance was measured at baseline and at 1- and 2-year follow-up visits using a neuropsychological test battery. Results: Participants who reported more SMCs improved less in global cognition, executive function, and memory during the subsequent 2 years in the fully-adjusted analyses. Self-reported retrospective memory problems predicted less improvement in all cognitive domains, whereas prospective memory problems did not. Informant-reported memory problems were not linked to subsequent change in cognition. Conclusion: Our results indicate that self-reported SMCs, measured with PRMQ, predict future cognitive change in several cognitive domains. By contrast, reports by informants were not linked to changes in cognition. Among cognitively healthy at-risk elderly individuals, the persons themselves observe more easily problems relevant for their future cognitive trajectories than their informants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOS PRESS , 2019. Vol. 71, no 3, p. 785-795
Keywords [en]
Aging, cognition, dementia, memory
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-164492DOI: 10.3233/JAD-190133ISI: 000488819100007PubMedID: 31424391OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-164492DiVA, id: diva2:1362926
Available from: 2019-10-22 Created: 2019-10-22 Last updated: 2019-10-22Bibliographically approved

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Stigsdotter Neely, Anna

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