umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Shakespeare and 'Shakespere' in Justin Cronin and Emily St John Mandel
Umeå University.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7243-0059
2019 (English)In: Foundation: The International Review of Science Fiction, ISSN 0306-4964, Vol. 48, no 134, p. 19-31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There appears to be an affinity between Shakespeare and postapocalyptic fiction. His works are invoked in a number of such novels, including Justin Cronin’s The Passage (2010) and Emily St. John Mandel’s Station Eleven (2014). Cronin’s novel is mainly set ninety-two years after a failed military experiment that has turned a large part of the American population into vampires, where what is left of humanity is living under a constant threat of violent extinction. Here Shakespeare is only present in a number of epigraphs, what Gerard Genette has referred to as ‘mute gesture[s]’ (156). In Mandel’s novel, set mainly in an America slowly recovering twenty years after a devastating influenza epidemic that killed millions of people, Shakespeare has a greater presence, both through the framing story of a production of King Lear, and through a travelling acting company, which almost exclusively performs Shakespeare’s plays. In this article I investigate the various ways in which Shakespeare is referenced and utilised, as well as which of his texts the authors have chosen to include, discussing what work the Shakespearean references perform and how they relate to questions of cultural memory. I argue that the epigraphs in The Passage, although relying on the reader’s participation in application and interpretation in order not to be a ‘mute gesture’, could be said to be of greater relevance to the reception and understanding of the novel, than Station Eleven’s often casual references to Shakespeare’s ‘greatest hits’.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dagenham: Science Fiction Foundation , 2019. Vol. 48, no 134, p. 19-31
Keywords [en]
science fiction, genre fiction, cultural capital
National Category
Specific Literatures
Research subject
English
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-165055OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-165055DiVA, id: diva2:1368526
Available from: 2019-11-07 Created: 2019-11-07 Last updated: 2019-11-14Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

URL

Authority records BETA

Åström, Berit

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Åström, Berit
By organisation
Umeå University
In the same journal
Foundation: The International Review of Science Fiction
Specific Literatures

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 68 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf