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Self-reported sexual health, knowledge and use of SRH services and testing behavior among Somali migrants in Sweden.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
2018 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Background: Migration is becoming a challenging issue in today’s globalized word. Sweden is nowadays a multicultural society with over18,5% of its population have migrant background. Somalis are one of the largest groups of migrants living in Sweden. Poor maternal health during pregnancy, low utilization of healthcare services, perinatal mortality, high risk for emergency caesarian sections and late and poor access to maternity health care services have been identified among Somali migrants in Sweden. This study aims to describe self-reported sexual health, knowledge and use of sexual health and reproductive health services and testing behavior among Somali migrants in Sweden.

Methods: This is a cross-sectional study using a questionnaire that was administered to 200 Somali migrants aged 16 or more in four counties in Sweden. These included (n=57) women and (n=71) men. The median age was 17 years old and up to 60% of the respondents were between 16-29 years old. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were used to analyse data.

Results: The questionnaire was administered to a total of 200 Somalis but only 130 answered it and returned it. The respondent rate varied depending on the question. The majority (68%) of Somalis reported that they had good or very good sexual health. Few have recently visited SRH services and few have refrained from healthcare visit despite needs. Among those few who refrained from visiting, lack of knowledge was their main reason. More than have reported to never been tested for HIV/STIs and a quarter didn’t know where to go. Only 38% knew where to get contraceptives. Bivariate logistic regression shows that respondents who feel that they are somewhat part of the Swedish society (OR: 0.17; 95%CI: 0.06-0.5; p=0.002) and those who feel they are not part Swedish society (OR: 0.1; 95%CI: 0.03-0.4; p=0.000) have lower odds to have good sexual health than those who are integrated. Those who have less than 12 years of education (OR:7-12 Years 0.14;95%CI:0.2-09; p=0.038) have lower odds to use SRH services. Living in camps or with friends (AOR:6,3; 95%CI:0.8-49; p=0.08) and those who reported living alone (AOR:6; 95%CI:1.5-23;p=0.009) have higher odds of recent utilization of SRH care services.

Conclusions: The findings indicate that Somali migrants have in general good self-reported sexual health, but they are at risk of having lack of knowledge about where to get contraceptive, where to go for testing and low level of education which can lead tounderutilization of SHR services and negative SRH outcomes. Therefore, it is very important for policy makers and public health workers to put the mentioned problems into consideration and take measures to reduce the risks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. , p. 24
Series
Centre for Public Health Report Series, ISSN 1651-341X ; 2018:53
Keywords [en]
Contraceptive, Migrants, Somali, Healthcare utilization, HIV/STI, Knowledge about SRH services
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-165256OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-165256DiVA, id: diva2:1373047
External cooperation
MSRHR 2018 - Swedish Public Health Agency
Educational program
Master's Programme in Public Health
Presentation
2018-10-18, Butajira, Building 5B NUS, 3rd floor, Umeå University, Umeå, 15:00 (English)
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2019-11-27 Created: 2019-11-26 Last updated: 2019-11-27Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
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