umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Modelling population retention in Australia's Northern Territory: how do current forms of migration contribute to population turnover and retention?
Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8143-123x
2019 (English)In: Australian Geographer, ISSN 0004-9182, E-ISSN 1465-3311, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 435-452Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the past, population growth in Australia's Northern Territory, as in other peripheral parts of high-income countries, has been driven by internal labour migration and migration from outside of Australia. These have been contributing to the high population turnover experienced in peripheral areas. Since 2010, the Northern Territory has experienced low (and even negative) population growth, and public policy is currently focused on migration as a lever to reverse this trend. However, the extent to which the characteristics of migrants influence the potential for longer-term population growth is poorly understood. This paper uses a new method to analyse the contributions of various types of migrants to both population turnover and retention. Two major sets of findings emerge: First, the significance of separating newer in-migrants from longer-term residents when analysing migration patterns; and secondly, the contribution of age, gender, Indigenous status, international origin, wages and industry of employment to the Northern Territory's population turnover. The research suggests that current forms of migration favour people who are likely to stay for only short periods, and have high wage demands. The main policy inference is that long-term population growth will likely not eventuate unless new forms of migration can be stimulated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019. Vol. 50, no 4, p. 435-452
Keywords [en]
Northern Territory, migration, peripheral areas, population turnover, retention, modelling
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-165459DOI: 10.1080/00049182.2019.1682318ISI: 000493587300001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-165459DiVA, id: diva2:1373801
Available from: 2019-11-28 Created: 2019-11-28 Last updated: 2020-01-09Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Carson, Dean B.

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Carson, Dean B.
By organisation
Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University
In the same journal
Australian Geographer
Human Geography

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 11 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf