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Neonatal Mortality and Temperature in Two Northern Swedish Rural Parishes, 1860–1899—The Significance of Ethnicity and Gender
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7406-7836
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1561-4094
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9722-0370
2020 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 4, article id 1216Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to analyze the association between season of birth and daily temperature for neonatal mortality in two Swedish rural parishes between 1860 and 1899. Further, we aimed to study whether the association varied according to ethnicity (indigenous Sami reindeer herders and non-Sami settlers) and gender. The source material for this study comprised digitized parish records from the Demographic Data Base, Umeå University, combined with local weather data provided by the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute. Using a time event-history approach, we investigated the association between daily temperature (at birth and up to 28 days after birth) and the risk of neonatal death during the coldest months (November through March). The results showed that Sami neonatal mortality was highest during winter and that the Sami neonatal mortality risk decreased with higher temperatures on the day of birth. Male neonatal risk decreased with higher temperatures during the days following birth, while no effect of temperature was observed among female neonates. We conclude that weather vulnerability differed between genders and between the indigenous and non-indigenous populations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel: MDPI, 2020. Vol. 17, no 4, article id 1216
Keywords [en]
neonatal mortality, temperature, seasonality, indigenous population, gender, Sweden
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Historical Demography
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-168105DOI: 10.3390/ijerph17041216ISI: 000522388500092PubMedID: 32070044OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-168105DiVA, id: diva2:1393914
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P17-0033:1Available from: 2020-02-17 Created: 2020-02-17 Last updated: 2020-04-27Bibliographically approved

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Lena, KarlssonHäggström Lundevaller, ErlingSchumann, Barbara

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