umu.sePublikationer
Ändra sökning
RefereraExporteraLänk till posten
Permanent länk

Direktlänk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Disrupting assimilationist research principles and practices in Australia and Sweden: self-determination through the enactment of Indigenous diplomacies
University of Sydney.ORCID-id: 0000-0001-8004-6284
Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för samisk forskning (CeSam).ORCID-id: 0000-0002-4853-9641
2019 (Engelska)Ingår i: Seton Hall journal of diplomacy and international relations, E-ISSN 1538-6589, Vol. XXI, nr 1, s. 36-53Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
Abstract [en]

Embedded with pre-existing meaning and a complex set of core principles and practices, "diplomacy" is a term familiar to most. Simply put, diplomacy is the established methods of influencing the decisions and behavior of foreign governments and peoples through dialogue, negotiation, and other measures to resolve conflict and maintain peace. In this article, we review the literature pertaining to the concept of diplomacy, focusing primarily on the lesser recognized diplomacies of First Peoples in Australia and Sweden. Through the telling of three significant events, historical and contemporary, drawn from many possible examples of the two nations, we demonstrate that Indigenous diplomacies are not new but rather newly recognized. We argue for the utilization of Indigenous diplomatic practices to realize self-determining research with, and by, First Peoples. In doing so, centuries of colonization that have resulted in power imbalances, which sought to assimilate and benefit settler/colonizer privilege through its governing institutions, may be disrupted and transformed. According to the literature search undertaken, this is an approach to Indigenous research that has received scant attention. Our discussion is guided by two key questions. First, can research informed by Indigenous diplomatic practices disrupt assimilationist research agendas set predominantly by society's governing institutions? Second, can recognition of Indigenous diplomatic principles and practices facilitate self-determining research? We draw on our experiences as Indigenous and non-Indigenous researchers to suggest that the enactment of Indigenous diplomatic practices when undertaking our research 'proper ways' with First Peoples, according to Indigenous ways of knowing, being, and doing, has facilitated its success.

Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
South Orange, NJ: The School of Diplomacy and International Relations, Seton Hall University , 2019. Vol. XXI, nr 1, s. 36-53
Nationell ämneskategori
Statsvetenskap
Identifikatorer
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-169283OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-169283DiVA, id: diva2:1417792
Tillgänglig från: 2020-03-30 Skapad: 2020-03-30 Senast uppdaterad: 2020-03-30Bibliografiskt granskad

Open Access i DiVA

Fulltext saknas i DiVA

Övriga länkar

URL

Personposter BETA

Sehlin MacNeil, Kristina

Sök vidare i DiVA

Av författaren/redaktören
Daniels-Mayes, SheelaghSehlin MacNeil, Kristina
Av organisationen
Centrum för samisk forskning (CeSam)
Statsvetenskap

Sök vidare utanför DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetricpoäng

urn-nbn
Totalt: 56 träffar
RefereraExporteraLänk till posten
Permanent länk

Direktlänk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf