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Preanalytical effects of pneumatic tube transport on routine haematology, coagulation parameters, platelet function and global coagulation
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
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2009 (English)In: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, ISSN 1434-6621, Vol. 46, no 10, 1443-1449 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Pneumatic tube transport of blood samples reduces turnaround times and labour. However, the preanalytical effects on new clinical chemistry parameters and instruments are not fully known. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pneumatic tube transport on haematology and coagulation parameters, including platelet function with PFA-100®, and global coagulation with a thromboelastograph.

Methods: Paired venous blood samples from healthy volunteers were obtained before and after 1 week of treatment with acetylsalicylic acid. One sample was transported by pneumatic tube transport, while the other remained in the laboratory.

Results: No preanalytical effect of pneumatic tube transport could be seen for most haematology and coagulation parameters, as well as analysis with PFA-100®. For the thromboelastographic analysis, time to clot formation was shorter (–16%, p=0.037) in the transported samples. Treatment with acetylsalicylic acid had no effect on the majority of the test results.

Conclusions: Pneumatic tube transport does not introduce preanalytical errors when transporting samples for analysis of routine haematology, coagulation parameters and platelet function with the PFA-100®. We recommend manual transport of samples for analysis with thromboelastographic techniques.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 46, no 10, 1443-1449 p.
Keyword [en]
platelet function anlysis, pneumatic tube transport, preanaltical, thromboelastograph, venous blood specimen
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-3263DOI: 10.1515/CCLM.2008.288PubMedID: 18844500OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-3263DiVA: diva2:141787
Available from: 2008-05-21 Created: 2008-05-21 Last updated: 2012-08-14Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Preanalytical errors in hospitals: implications for quality improvement of blood sample collection
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preanalytical errors in hospitals: implications for quality improvement of blood sample collection
2008 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background: Most errors in the venous blood testing process are preanalytical, i.e. they occur before the sample reaches the laboratory. Unlike the laboratory analysis, the preanalytical phase involves several error-prone manual tasks not easily avoided with technological solutions. Despite the importance of the preanalytical phase for a correct test result, little is known about how blood samples are collected in hospitals.

Aim: The aim of this thesis was to survey preanalytical procedures in hospitals to identify sources of error.

Methods: The first part of this thesis was a questionnaire survey. After a pilot study (Paper I), a questionnaire addressing clinical chemistry testing was completed by venous blood sampling staff (n=314, response rate 94%) in hospital wards and hospital laboratories (Papers II–IV). The second part of this thesis was an experimental study. Haematology, coagulation, platelet function and global coagulation parameters were compared between pneumatic tube-transported samples and samples that had not been transported (Paper V).

Results: The results of the questionnaire survey indicate that the desirable procedure for the collection and handling of venous blood samples were not always followed in the wards (Papers II–III). For example, as few as 2.4% of the ward staff reported to always label the test tube immediately before sample collection. Only 22% of the ward staff reported to always use wristbands for patient identification, while 18% reported to always use online laboratory manuals, the only source of updated information. However, a substantial part of the ward staff showed considerable interest in re-education (45%) and willingness to improve routines (44%) for venous blood sampling. Compared to the ward staff, the laboratory staff reported significantly higher proportions of desirable practices regarding test request management, test tube labelling, test information search procedures, and the collection and handling of venous blood samples, but not regarding patient identification. Of the ward staff, only 5.5% had ever filed an error report regarding venous blood sampling, compared to 28% of the laboratory staff (Paper IV). In the experimental study (Paper V), no significant preanalytical effect of pneumatic tube transport was found for most haematology, coagulation and platelet function parameters. However, time-to-clot formation was significantly shorter (16%) in the pneumatic tube-transported samples, indicating an in vitro activation of global coagulation.

Conclusions. The questionnaire study of the rated experiences of venous blood sampling ward staff is the first of its kind to survey manual tasks in the preanalytical phase. The results suggest a clinically important risk of preanalytical errors in the surveyed wards. Computerised test request management will eliminate some, but not all, of the identified risks. The better performance reported by the laboratory staff may reflect successful quality improvement initiatives in the laboratories. The current error reporting system needs to be functionally implemented. The experimental study indicates that pneumatic tube transport does not introduce preanalytical errors for regular tests, but manual transport is recommended for analysis with thromboelastographic technique. This thesis underscores the importance of quality improvement in the preanalytical phase of venous blood testing in hospitals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Medicinsk biovetenskap, 2008. 64 p.
Series
Umeå University medical dissertations, ISSN 0346-6612 ; 1177
Keyword
medical errors, preanalytical, quality improvement, questionnaire, venous blood sampling
National Category
Other Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-1672 (URN)978-91-7264-562-2 (ISBN)
Public defence
2008-06-13, Hörsal Betula, Norrlands Universitetssjukhus, 901 85, Umeå, 09:00 (English)
Opponent
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Available from: 2008-05-21 Created: 2008-05-21 Last updated: 2011-01-25Bibliographically approved

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Wallin, OlofSöderberg, JohanGrankvist, KjellJonsson, AndreasHultdin, Johan

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