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Process and representation in multiple-cue judgment
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
2002 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis investigates the cognitive processes and representations underlying human judgment in a multiple-cue judgment task. Several recent models assume that people have several qualitatively distinct and competing levels of knowledge representations (Ashby, Alfonso-Reese, Turken, & Waldron, 1998; Erickson & Kruschke, 1998; Nosofsky, Palmeri, & McKinley, 1994; Sloman, 1996). The most successful cognitive models in categorization and multiple-cue judgment are, respectively, exemplar-based models and rule-based models. Study 1 investigated if the different theoretical conclusions in categorization and multiple-cue judgment derive from genuine differences in the processes, or are accidental to the different research methods. The results revealed large individual differences and a shift from exemplar memory to cue abstraction when the criterion is changed from a binary to a continuous variable, and especially for a probabilistic criterion. People appear to switch between qualitatively distinct processes in the two tasks. In Study 2, we expected learning in dyads to promote explicit rule-based thinking as a consequence of verbalization (social abstraction effect) and performance to improve due to the larger joint exemplar knowledge base (exemplar pooling effect). Study 2 suggests that dyads perform better, making more accurate judgments than participants working alone, but we failed to detect any difference in the representation of knowledge. When working in dyads, we can store more exemplars in memory together that leads to more efficient exploitation of memory and exemplar retrieval dominates the judgments. In contrast to earlier research, dyads surpassed the combined base-line level defined by the aggregated performance by members of the dyad working alone. Taken together, the results of these studies indicate that the differences that characterize typical categorization and multiple- cue judgment tasks are conducive of qualitatively different cognitive processes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Psykologi , 2002. , 25 p.
Series
Umeå Psychology Supplement Reports, ISSN 1653-7688 ; 1
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-1925OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-1925DiVA: diva2:142454
Presentation
2002-11-29, BT 102, Beteendevetarhuset, Umeå universitet, Umeå, 13:00 (English)
Supervisors
Available from: 2008-11-20 Created: 2008-11-20 Last updated: 2009-06-10Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Exemplar effects in categorization and multiple-cue judgment.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exemplar effects in categorization and multiple-cue judgment.
2003 (English)In: Journal of experimental psychology. General, ISSN 0096-3445, E-ISSN 1939-2222, Vol. 1, no 132, 133-156 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-3948 (URN)10.1037/0096-3445.132.1.133 (DOI)
Available from: 2004-05-06 Created: 2004-05-06 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
2. Individuals and dyads in a multiple-cue judgment task: Cognitive processes and performance
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Individuals and dyads in a multiple-cue judgment task: Cognitive processes and performance
2006 (English)In: Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, ISSN 0022-1031, E-ISSN 1096-0465, Vol. 42, no 1, 40-56 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Virtually all studies of multiple-cue judgment focus on the learning by individuals. In a multiple-cue judgment task the authors examined if people acquire rule or exemplar knowledge as a function of learning the task alone or in dyads. Learning in dyads was expected to promote explicit rule-based thinking as a consequence of verbalization (social abstraction effect) and to improve performance due to the larger joint exemplar knowledge base (exemplar pooling effect). In two experiments the results suggest more accurate judgment by dyads, evidence for an exemplar pooling effect, but no evidence for the social abstraction effect. In contrast to most previous research, social interaction proved beneficial and allowed the dyads to surpass their combined individual performance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2006
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-3949 (URN)10.1016/j.jesp.2005.01.004 (DOI)
Note
Titeln har ändrats vid publicering. Förut: Individual and dyadic learning in a multiple-cue judgment task.Available from: 2004-05-06 Created: 2004-05-06 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
  • apa
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  • Other locale
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Output format
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