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Gender, culture and non-financial employment commitment in Great Britain and Sweden
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
2008 (English)In: European Societies: The Official Journal of the European Sociological Association, ISSN 1461-6696, E-ISSN 1469-8307, Vol. 10, no 1, 73-96 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The main question this paper seeks to tackle is whether men and women, as some argue, commit themselves to employment differently or for different reasons. The focus is thus on the mechanisms behind non-financial employment commitment (such as the possible effect of family situation, occupational position, and of different work-related preferences and experiences). The question is comparatively investigated in Sweden and Great Britain, where, in spite of many similarities, the existence of different societal/cultural contexts with relevance for gender and work has been suggested. The results in this paper suggest that the most important motivator for non-financial employment commitment is interesting work, which was found to have a positive effect both as a work goal and as experienced in the workplace. Although women and men in both countries displayed quite similar patterns, some country and gender differences appeared in the way occupational position and degree of education relate to this type of commitment. Higher occupational position and education where more clearly related to higher degrees of commitment for British women than for British men, while the Swedish gender pattern was reversed. In the concluding discussion, possible explanations and implications are discussed, and avenues for further research are suggested.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, Taylor & Francis , 2008. Vol. 10, no 1, 73-96 p.
Keyword [en]
culture, employment commitment, gender, preferences, work goals, work rewards, work values
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-4180DOI: 10.1080/14616690701592573OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-4180DiVA: diva2:143171
Available from: 2004-11-01 Created: 2004-11-01 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. The way we conform to paid labour: Commitment to employment and organization from a comparative perspective
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The way we conform to paid labour: Commitment to employment and organization from a comparative perspective
2004 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis compares work orientations in six Western countries (the USA, Great Britain, New Zealand, Germany, Norway, and Sweden), using data from the 1997 International Social Survey Program (ISSP). The main issue examined is whether different ‘production regimes’ correspond to levels and patterns of employment and organizational commitment among the working population.

It is concluded that the country levels of employment commitment varies depending on the institutional set-ups, with respect to production and welfare regimes, being highest in the Scandinavian countries and lowest in Great Britain and the USA. Organizational commitment varies in a more complex manner, with the strongest commitment being found in the USA and the lowest in Sweden. In all countries, the most important factor determining the level of an individual’s organizational commitment is whether the person finds his or her job interesting. This effect is independent of job satisfaction. Organizational commitment was also found to be positively and strongly correlated with right-wing political values in five of the six countries. When it comes to employment commitment, it was found that women display, often significantly, higher commitment than do men. The results suggest that the most important motivator for employment commitment is the desire for interesting work. The concluding discussion summarises and presents the main findings in schematic figures, and includes interpretative discussions focusing on future research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Sociologiska institutionen, Umeå universitet, 2004. 43 p.
Series
Akademiska avhandlingar vid Sociologiska institutionen, Umeå universitet, ISSN 1104-2508 ; A 36
Keyword
Sociology, Employment Commitment, Job Satisfaction, Organizational Commitment, Person-Environment Fit, Political Values, Production Regimes, Work Rewards, Work Values, Sociologi
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-343 (URN)91-7305-751-7 (ISBN)
Public defence
2004-12-03, Hörsal G, Humanisthuset, Umeå universitet, 901 87 Umeå, 10:15
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2004-11-01 Created: 2004-11-01 Last updated: 2012-02-24Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
  • apa
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