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Salmonella Amager, Campylobacter jejuni, and urease-positive thermophilic Campylobacter found in free-flying peregrine falcons (Falco peregrinus) in Sweden
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
Research Institute for Zoonotic Ecology and Epidemiology, Färjestaden, Sweden and Department of Animal Ecology, Ecology Building, Lund University, Lund, Sweden .
Department of Zoology, University of Göteborg, Göteborg, Sweden .
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2004 (English)In: Journal of Wildlife Diseases, ISSN 0090-3558, E-ISSN 1943-3700, Vol. 40, no 3, 583-587 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Rare species with small population sizes are vulnerable to perturbations such as disease, inbreeding, or random events. The threat arising from microbial pathogens could be large and other species could act as reservoirs for pathogens. We report finding three enteric bacterial species, Salmonella Amager, Campylobacter jejuni, and urease-positive thermophilic Campylobacter, in nestling free-flying peregrine falcons (Falco peregrinus) in Sweden in 2000. Campylobacter jejuni isolates exhibited marked genetic similarities to an isolate from a human, providing a possible association between a human-associated strain of this bacterium and peregrine falcons.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wildlife Disease Association , 2004. Vol. 40, no 3, 583-587 p.
Keyword [en]
Animals, Bird Diseases/*epidemiology/microbiology, Campylobacter/*isolation & purification, Campylobacter Infections/epidemiology/veterinary, Campylobacter jejuni/isolation & purification, Disease Reservoirs/*veterinary, Feces/microbiology, Raptors/*microbiology, Salmonella/*isolation & purification, Salmonella Infections; Animal/epidemiology, Sweden/epidemiology
National Category
Infectious Medicine Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-7345DOI: 10.7589/0090-3558-40.3.583PubMedID: 15465731OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-7345DiVA: diva2:147016
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digitalisering@umu
Available from: 2008-01-08 Created: 2008-01-08 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Importance of wild birds in the spread of Salmonella
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Importance of wild birds in the spread of Salmonella
2002 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Salmonella is one of the most important enteropathogenic bacteria. It is responsible for about 5000 reported cases of human gastroenteritis each year in Sweden. Salmonellosis is a zoonotic disease, and the bacterium has the ability to infect a variety of both domestic and wild animal species.

In studies of Swedish wild bird populations, we found that Black-headed gull may be the main reservoir for Salmonella in birds, and that Salmonella infection is expressed as carriage with no obvious disease manifestations. Black-headed gull is a migratory bird and can transport strains of Salmonella with virulence traits like antibiotic resistance, from sources outside Sweden. Genetic molecular methods, PFGE and IS200, also demonstrate that Black-headed gull play a role in the transmission chain of Salmonella in Sweden.

In a study of the Swedish Peregrine Falcon population, Salmonella amager and Campylobacter jejuni were found. There were indications, based on serotyping of Salmonella and genetical typing by PFGE of Campylobacter that these isolates were transmitsted to the falcons from a human or domestic animal source. This bird of prey has sparse contact with humans but may be infected by Salmonella of human origin by feeding on other birds, like gull.

Salmonella was found in penguins, albatrosses and mainly in seals in a study in Antarctica. Several features of the Salmonella serotypes found indicate a human source for Salmonella infection in these animals, and also a spread of Salmonella within and between animal species in Antarctica.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå Universitet, 2002. 61 p.
Series
Umeå University medical dissertations, 0346-6612 ; N.S., 795
Keyword
Salmonella, wild birds, Black-headed gull, Peregrine falcon, Antarctica, penguins, seals, PFGE, IS200, salmonella carriage
National Category
Infectious Medicine Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-94107 (URN)91-7305-255-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2002-05-31, Norrlands universitetssjukhus, byggnad 6E, sal E04, Umeå universitet, Umeå, 13:00
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Supervisors
Projects
digitalisering@umu
Note

Diss. (sammanfattning) Umeå : Umeå universitet, 2002

Available from: 2014-11-19 Created: 2014-10-03 Last updated: 2015-04-09Bibliographically approved

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Palmgren, HelenaBroman, TinaOlsen, Björn
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