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Social variations in infant growth performance in Severodvinsk, Northwest Russia: community-based cohort study.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
2004 (English)In: Croat Med J, ISSN 0353-9504, Vol. 45, no 6, 757-63 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Snoring and obstructive sleep apnea form part of a spectrum of sleep disordered breathing affecting a significant proportion of the general population and particularly the middle aged. The consequences can be severe and even life threatening for both the individual directly affected and those more remotely involved. Adverse sequelae can manifest themselves acutely or in the longer term as a result of obstructive breathing induced hypersomnolence, neurocognitive deficits and cardiovascular abnormilities. The combination of anatomical and neuromuscular risk factors in the pathogenesis of OSA has resulted in a varied appoach to its management. One such treatment option is mandibular repositioning appliances (MRA), which mechanically stabilize the airway. Whilst the efficacy of this simple intervention has been rigorously proven quite recently in a significant proportion of patients with varying disease severity, individual patient selection in its application remains uncertain. Short-term side-effects are common but usually transient, whilst in the long-term minor permanent adverse developments on the dentition and occlusion have been reported. Considering both the medicolegal implications of snoring and OSA and the increasing popularity of MRA, it is recommended that skilled multidisciplinary respiratory and dental personnel form the primary care team.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2004. Vol. 45, no 6, 757-63 p.
Keyword [en]
Adolescent, Adult, Anthropometry, Body Height, Body Weight, Female, Growth, Humans, Infant, Linear Models, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Mothers, Russia, Socioeconomic Factors
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-7514PubMedID: 15578812OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-7514DiVA: diva2:147185
Available from: 2008-01-12 Created: 2008-01-12 Last updated: 2011-01-12Bibliographically approved

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