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Seasonal and runoff-related changes in dissolved organic carbon concentrations in the River Öre, Northern Sweden
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
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2008 (English)In: Aquatic Sciences, Vol. 70, no 1, 21-29 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The impact of runoff on allochthonous organic carbon was studied in the River Öre, Northern Sweden, using extensive TOC (total organic carbon) and runoff measurements. No relationship existed between TOC concentration and runoff on an annual basis. However, positive correlations between TOC concentration and runoff were found when observations were divided into three different seasons (winter, spring and summer/autumn). During these seasons runoff explained 62-70% of the TOC variation. Differences in these seasonal relationships indicated that the TOC concentration was restricted by the soil TOC pool during snowmelt, while the pool of TOC in the soil or its availability never limited the TOC export during the rest of the year. Two sets of data were used, a detailed study over 2 years and a long-term study over 14 years. Both showed similar results which indicated that the seasonal variation in the relationship between TOC and runoff is similar from year to year. The chemical variation usually decreases downstream in large rivers due to mixing of water from different sources. Our study, however, showed a strong correlation between TOC and runoff even in a large river like the River Öre. This result indicated that the general pattern of the TOC concentrations was to a large extent determined by the hydrology and climate conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 70, no 1, 21-29 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-11460DOI: doi:10.1007/s00027-007-0943-9OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-11460DiVA: diva2:151131
Available from: 2009-01-09 Created: 2009-01-09 Last updated: 2011-01-10Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Seasonal variation and landscape regulation of dissolved organic carbon concentrations and character in Swedish boreal streams
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Seasonal variation and landscape regulation of dissolved organic carbon concentrations and character in Swedish boreal streams
2007 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The seasonal variation and landscape regulation of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in streams have been studied in two watersheds in the boreal zone. The seasonal variation was found to be highly correlated to variations in runoff. An increase in runoff was always accompanied with an increase in DOC concentration. However, there were indications that the TOC concentration was restricted by the soil TOC pool during snowmelt.

The main factors affecting DOC exports varied between seasons. During winter baseflow the spatial variation in DOC exports was strongly influenced by wetland coverage, during snowmelt the exports were correlated to factors describing the size and location of the catchment, and during the snow-free season they were heavily affected by the proportions of wetlands and forests in the catchments. Small headwaters had the highest terrestrial DOC export, per unit area.

The properties of the DOC changed during spring flood, towards lower molecular weight and more aliphatic compounds. These changes affected the bioavailability of the DOC, which increased during spring flood. There were also differences in the DOC properties between wetlands and forest soils; the forested soils yielded DOC with lower molecular weight (measured as 254 nm/365 nm light absorbance ratios), largely from superficial layers that were activated during high flow events, while wetland soils generally provided a more constant carbon source with higher molecular weight. The majority of the DOC was exported by wetlands, but most of the short-term bioavailable DOC (BP7) was derived from the forests, during the spring flood period, indicating that bacterial production in streams and lakes is likely to be almost entirely based on DOC exported from forested areas during, and some time after, the spring flood event.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap, 2007. 35 p.
Keyword
DOC, temporal variation, spatial variation, seasonal variation, forested catchment, wetland catchment, catchment characteristics, DOC characteristics, absorbance-ratio, bioavailability.
National Category
Physical Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-1374 (URN)978-91-7264-372-7 (ISBN)
Public defence
2007-10-19, KB3A9, KBC, Umeå universitet, Umeå, 09:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2007-09-28 Created: 2007-09-28 Last updated: 2010-01-08Bibliographically approved

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