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Deranged jaw-neck motor control in whiplash-associated disorders
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Clinical Oral Physiology.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Clinical Oral Physiology.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Clinical Oral Physiology.
2004 (English)In: European Journal of Oral Sciences, ISSN 0909-8836, E-ISSN 1600-0722, Vol. 112, no 1, 25-32 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent findings of simultaneous and well coordinated head-neck movements during single as well as rhythmic jaw opening-closing tasks has led to the conclusion that functional jaw movements´are the result of activation of jaw as well as neck muscles, leading to simultaneous movements in the temporomandibular, atlanto-occipital and cervical spine joints. It can therefore be assumed that disease or injury to any of these joint systems would disturb natural jaw function. To test this hypothesis, amplitudes, temporal coordination, and spatiotemporal consistency of concomitant mandibular and head-neck movements during single maximal jaw opening-closing tasks were analysed in 25 individuals suffering from whiplash-associated disorders (WAD) using optoelectronic movement recording technique. In addition, the relative durations for which the head position was equal to, leading ahead of, or lagging behind the mandibular position during the entire jaw opening-closing cycle were determined. Compared with healthy individuals, the WAD group showed smaller amplitudes, and changed temporal coordination between mandibular and head-neck movements. No divergence from healthy individuals was found for the spatiotemporal consistency or for the analysis during the entire jaw opening-closing cycle. These findings in the WAD group of a ´faulty, but yet consistent, jaw-neck behaviour may reflect a basic importance of linked control of the jaw and neck sensory-motor systems. In conclusion, the present results suggest that neck injury is associated with deranged control of mandibular and head-neck movements during jaw opening-closing tasks, and therefore might compromise natural jaw function.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2004. Vol. 112, no 1, 25-32 p.
Keyword [en]
Human, jaw, neck, movement, whiplash
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-13008DOI: 10.1111/j.0909-8836.2004.00098.xPubMedID: 14871190OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-13008DiVA: diva2:152679
Available from: 2008-01-31 Created: 2008-01-31 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved

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