umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
A longitudinal descriptive study of self-reported abnormal smell and taste perception in pregnant women
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
2004 (English)In: Chemical Senses, ISSN 0379-864X, E-ISSN 1464-3553, Vol. 29, no 5, 391-402 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Self-reported abnormal sensitivity, qualitative distortions and phantom sensations with respect to smell and taste was assessed with a longitudinal design, based on questions referring to gestational weeks 13–16 and 31–34 of pregnancy in comparison with 9–12 weeks post partum and with non-pregnant women with corresponding time durations and intervals. The results show that abnormal smell and/or taste perception was reported by 76% of the pregnant women, typically believed to be caused by their pregnancy. Increased smell sensitivity was found to be very common at the early stage of pregnancy (67% of all pregnant respondents) and occasionally accompanied by qualitative smell distortions (17%) and phantom smells (14%). The smell abnormalities were less common at the late pregnancy stage and almost absent post partum. Abnormal taste sensitivity was fairly commonly reported (26%), often described as increased bitter sensitivity and decreased salt sensitivity. These results, suggesting that abnormal smell and/or taste perception is experienced by a large majority of pregnant women, imply that further research is needed to understand to what extent these chemosensory changes may underlie food aversions and craving with implications for food intake during pregnancy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press , 2004. Vol. 29, no 5, 391-402 p.
Keyword [en]
distortion, gustation, olfaction, phantom sensation, pregnancy, sensitivity
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-13831DOI: 10.1093/chemse/bjh040PubMedID: 15201206OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-13831DiVA: diva2:153502
Available from: 2007-09-28 Created: 2007-09-28 Last updated: 2011-06-07Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Nordin, StevenBroman, Daniel AOlofsson, Jonas KWulff, Marianne

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Nordin, StevenBroman, Daniel AOlofsson, Jonas KWulff, Marianne
By organisation
Department of PsychologyObstetrics and Gynaecology
In the same journal
Chemical Senses
Psychology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 81 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf