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Objective B wave analysis in 55 patients with non-communicating and communicating hydrocephalus
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6451-1940
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2005 (English)In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, ISSN 0022-3050, E-ISSN 1468-330X, Vol. 76, 965-970 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: B waves, slow and rhythmic oscillations in intracranial pressure (ICP), are claimed to be one of the best predictors of outcome after surgery for normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH).

Object: To determine the relation between the percentage of B waves and outcome in patients with hydrocephalus, and also the diurnal variation of B waves.

Methods: ICP and patient behaviour were recorded overnight (17 to 26 hours) in 29 patients with non-communicating hydrocephalus and 26 with NPH. The B wave activity, measured with an amplitude threshold of 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 3.0, and 5.0 mm Hg, was estimated as the percentage of total monitoring time (% B waves) using a computer algorithm, and correlated with postoperative outcome, defined as changes in 12 standardised symptoms and signs.

Results: There was no linear correlation between improvement after surgery in the 55 patients and total % B waves, but a correlation was found between improvement and % B waves during sleep (r = 0.39, p = 0.04). The percentage of B waves was the same during sleep and wakefulness, and patients with NPH had the same proportion of B waves as the non-communicating patients.

Conclusions: B waves are commonly observed in patients with both communicating and non-communicating hydrocephalus, but are only weakly related to the degree of postsurgical improvement.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group , 2005. Vol. 76, 965-970 p.
Keyword [en]
normal-pressure hydrocephalus; endoscopic 3rd ventriculostomy; cerebrospinal-fluid pressure; primary aqueductal stenosis; arterial-blood pressure; intracranial-pressure; oscillations; outflow; cisternography; resistance
National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-14141DOI: 10.1136/jnnp.2004.039834ISI: 000230137200013OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-14141DiVA: diva2:153812
Available from: 2007-11-29 Created: 2007-11-29 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved

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Andersson, NinaEklund, AndersMalm, Jan
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