Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Demographic instability as a barrier to remote economic development in the north: Are cities the answer?
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8439-2640
2021 (English)In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 15, article id 8566Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Remote and sparsely populated northern peripheries in Australia, Europe and North America experience high rates of population turnover and struggle to recruit and retain popula-tions. There has been discussion about the extent to which their larger urban centres may be key to navigating common ‘boom and bust’ cycles, thus contributing to more stable and resilient demographic and economic development in their jurisdictions. This paper examines the population development in twelve remote northern jurisdictions dominated by a large city, comparing urban and regional growth patterns around periods of economic boom and bust since 1990. It was expected that periods of high population growth would be initially led by regional areas where resource projects are commonly located, but that the cities would ultimately benefit more from high growth periods and suffer less from periods of low population growth. It was also expected that cities would retain key populations better than regions because of a growing global urban preference. Results suggest that regional areas did grow more at the start of high growth periods, but there was no universal experience of higher city growth throughout the two boom and bust cycles. Rather, each city and region had unique growth pattern properties. Cities must not be assumed a priori to be the drivers of demographic development, but attention needs to be paid to what types of cities promote less volatile growth and development potential in the regions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2021. Vol. 13, no 15, article id 8566
Keywords [en]
Boom and bust, Jack London Effect, Northern cities, Population growth, Population retention, Resource cycle, Resource peripheries, Urban preference
National Category
Economic Geography Human Geography
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-186961DOI: 10.3390/su13158566ISI: 000682273900001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85112660619OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-186961DiVA, id: diva2:1588958
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2016-00352Available from: 2021-08-30 Created: 2021-08-30 Last updated: 2023-05-02Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(1120 kB)160 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 1120 kBChecksum SHA-512
2fa33ea85392dddb19c528042e2dc13cd63293ce3d36c5ec0bb4ce8c65e74224fe64dd35f80666b0eeb8e1a4d86f086706a830aa03fa4a9bad3389c471101172
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records

Carson, Doris Anna

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Carson, Doris Anna
By organisation
Department of Geography
In the same journal
Sustainability
Economic GeographyHuman Geography

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 160 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 229 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf