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Observations in favor of a presence of local catecholamine production in the human Achilles tendon - of importance when understanding potential adrenergic effects in Achilles tendinosis.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
2006 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The mid-portion of the Achilles tendon is a frequently injured and pathologically affected tendon region. Achilles tendinosis presents with chronic tendon pain and impaired function, and most often occurs in the mid-portion of the tendon. Nerve-related effects are likely to be of great significance in the pathogenesis of this condition, and information on innervation patterns is therefore of importance. However, the available information on these aspects is limited for the human Achilles tendon. Via staining for a general nerve marker it has previously been shown that there is a presence of innervation in the loose paratendinous connective tissue and to some extent also within the tendon tissue proper. This innervation has been found to partly conform to sensory innervation. There is no information at all on the patterns of sympathetic innervation in the human Achilles tendon. This is a drawback as it is crucial to know the basis for adrenergic effects on blood vessel regulation in tendinosis and as efferent sympathetic nerve activities may be related to pain symptoms. In the present study, therefore, specimens of tendon tissue from the human Achilles tendon of both tendinosis patients and normal controls were immunohistochemically examined concerning expression of the rate limiting enzyme in catecholamine production, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and of neuropeptide Y (NPY). In normal tendons, TH- and NPY-immunoreactive nerve fibers were occasionally detected in nerve fascicles and in arterial walls in the paratendinous tissue, but were not detected with certainty within the tendon tissue proper. In the specimens of tendinosis affected tendons, TH-and NPY-immunoreactive nerve fibers were almost non-existent. Surprisingly, however, TH-immunoreactions could be seen in the tendon cells (tenocytes) themselves. Sections were also processed for demonstration of α1-, α2a-, and β1- adrenoreceptors. It was hereby seen that there were immunoreactions for adrenergic receptors in the walls of some of the blood vessels, as well as in some of the tenocytes. The observations show that there is a limited sympathetic innervation at the level of the paratendinous tissue and in principle a non-existent such innervation within the tendon tissue proper. On the other hand, as evidenced by findings of TH-immunoreaction in tenocytes, it appears as if there is a local production of catecholamines within the tendon tissue proper itself. Thus, the tenocytes might be an important source of mediators that bind to the adrenergic receptors in the tissue. The observations of adrenergic receptors on tenocytes are furthermore of interest as adrenergic stimulation in other situations can lead to degenerative/apoptotic events and an affection on cell growth. These facts are thus highly interesting when trying to understand how such events can occur in Achilles tendinosis. Similarly, cartilage and menisci have in recent studies been found to harbor cells that express adrenergic receptors, but nevertheless to be very scarcely equipped with nerves. Although there is a very limited sympathetic innervation in the Achilles tendon, our observations show that there is a morphologic correlate for the occurrence of adrenergic actions in the tendon, via effects of locally produced catecholamines.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006.
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-20610OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-20610DiVA: diva2:209160
Conference
10th International Conference of Orthopaedics, Biomechanics and Sports Rehabilitation, Assisi, Italy, 2006
Available from: 2009-03-24 Created: 2009-03-24 Last updated: 2015-01-21Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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