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Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing of Escherichia coli strains from samples collected before and after pivmecillinam or placebo treatment of uncomplicated community-acquired urinary tract infection in women.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
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2006 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Microbiology, ISSN 0095-1137, E-ISSN 1098-660X, Vol. 44, no 5, 1776-81 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The primary infecting Escherichia coli strains from 156 women with community-acquired uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI) randomized to pivmecillinam or placebo and the E. coli strains causing UTI at two follow-up visits were typed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). In the pivmecillinam treatment group PFGE showed that among patients having a negative urine culture at the first follow-up 77% (46/60) had a relapse with the primary infecting E. coli strain and 23% (14/60) had reinfection with a new E. coli strain at the second follow-up. Among patients having E. coli at the first follow-up PFGE showed that 80% (32/40) had persistence with the primary infecting E. coli strain, 15% (6/40) had reinfection with a new E. coli strain, and 5% (2/40) had different E. coli strains at the two follow-up visits (one had reinfection followed by relapse, and the other had persistence followed by reinfection). In the placebo group the majority had E. coli at the first follow-up. PFGE showed that among these patients 96% (50/52) had persistence with the primary infecting E. coli strain and 4% (2/50) had different E. coli strains at the two follow-up visits (both had persistence followed by reinfection). The finding that the majority of UTIs at follow-up are caused by the primary infecting E. coli strain supports the theory of a vaginal and rectal reservoir but could also support the recent discovery that E. coli strains are able to persist in the bladder epithelium despite appropriate antibiotic treatment, constituting a reservoir for recurrent UTI.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 44, no 5, 1776-81 p.
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URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-21260DOI: 10.1128/JCM.44.5.1776-1781.2006PubMedID: 16672406OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-21260DiVA: diva2:211212
Available from: 2009-04-09 Created: 2009-04-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13

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