umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Bacterial freshwater species successfully immigrate to the brackish water environment in the northern Baltic
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF). (UMFpub)
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
2005 (English)In: Limnology and Oceanography, ISSN 0024-3590, E-ISSN 1939-5590, Vol. 50, no 3, 945-956 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We studied the distribution and seasonal dynamics of five species from the genus Flavobacterium and one species from the genus Marinomonas over the course of a year along a northern Baltic Sea river-marine transect. All of the species had been previously demonstrated as important consumers of riverine dissolved organic carbon. Quantitative DNA-DNA hybridization data showed that two of the Flavobacterium spp. and the Marinomonas sp. had highest abundance in the river water (maximum 20,000 cells ml-1), with maximum relative abundance of 0.5-2.5% of the bacterial community. These species declined in abundance from the river to the estuary and the offshore site. Abundance and dynamics in the estuarine environment suggested successful immigration of freshwater bacteria, accompanied by growth in the brackish water environment. Two of the three abundant species showed high cell numbers also during late autumn to early spring in the estuary, indicating a selective advantage when riverine dissolved organic carbon was the main carbon source. The remaining three species showed more episodic abundance close to the detection limit of the method, providing weaker evidence of occurrence in the freshwater environment. Some bacterioplankton consuming riverine organic carbon in the brackish water environment in the northern Baltic are therefore freshwater species, with a selective advantage during winter.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, 2005. Vol. 50, no 3, 945-956 p.
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-22927DOI: 10.4319/lo.2005.50.3.0945OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-22927DiVA: diva2:218553
Available from: 2009-05-20 Created: 2009-05-20 Last updated: 2017-10-24Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Kisand, VeljoAndersson, NinaWikner, Johan
By organisation
Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology)Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF)
In the same journal
Limnology and Oceanography
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 145 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf