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Low temperature maximizes growth of Crocus vernus (L.) Hill via changes in carbon partitioning and corm development.
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5151-5184
Département de biologie and Centre d’étude de la forêt, Université Laval, Québec City, Québec, Canada G1V 0A6.
2009 (English)In: Journal of Experimental Botany, ISSN 0022-0957, E-ISSN 1460-2431, Vol. 60, no 7, 2203-2213 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In Crocus vernus, a spring bulbous species, prolonged growth at low temperatures results in the development of larger perennial organs and delayed foliar senescence. Because corm growth is known to stop before the first visual sign of leaf senescence, it is clear that factors other than leaf duration alone determine final corm size. The aim of this study was to determine whether reduced growth at higher temperatures was due to decreased carbon import to the corm or to changes in the partitioning of this carbon once it had reached the corm. Plants were grown under two temperature regimes and the amount of carbon fixed, transported, and converted into a storable form in the corm, as well as the partitioning into soluble carbohydrates, starch, and the cell wall, were monitored during the growth cycle. The reduced growth at higher temperature could not be explained by a restriction in carbon supply or by a reduced ability to convert the carbon into starch. However, under the higher temperature regime, the plant allocated more carbon to cell wall material, and the amount of glucose within the corm declined earlier in the season. Hexose to sucrose ratios might control the duration of corm growth in C. vernus by influencing the timing of the cell division, elongation, and maturation phases. It is suggested that it is this shift in carbon partitioning, not limited carbon supply or leaf duration, which is responsible for the smaller final biomass of the corm at higher temperatures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 60, no 7, 2203-2213 p.
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-23139DOI: 10.1093/jxb/erp103PubMedID: 19403850OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-23139DiVA: diva2:220480
Available from: 2009-06-01 Created: 2009-06-01 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved

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