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Culling experiments demonstrate size-class specific biomass increases with mortality
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
2009 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Science of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, Vol. 106, no 8, 2671-2676 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Size-selective mortality inevitably leads to a decrease in population density and exerts a direct negative effect on targeted size classes. But density and population size structure are also shaped by food-dependent processes, such as individual growth, maturation, and reproduction. Mortality relaxes competition and thereby alters the dynamic interplay among these processes. As shown by the recently developed size-structured theory, which can account for food-dependent individual performance, this altered interplay can lead to overcompensatory responses in size class-specific biomass, with increasing mortality. We experimentally tested this theory by subjecting laboratory fish populations to a range of size-selective mortality rates. Overall, the results were in agreement with theoretical predictions. Biomass of the juvenile size class increased above control levels at intermediate adult mortality rates and thereafter declined at high mortality rates. Juvenile biomass also increased when juveniles themselves were subjected to intermediate mortality rates. Biomass in other size classes decreased with mortality. Such biomass overcompensation can have wide-ranging implications for communities and food webs, including a high sensitivity of top predators to irreversible catastrophic collapses, the establishment of alternative stable community states, and the promotion of coexistence and biodiversity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 106, no 8, 2671-2676 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-23309DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0808279106OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-23309DiVA: diva2:222772
Available from: 2009-06-09 Created: 2009-06-09

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Schröder , ArnePersson , Lennart

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