umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Cerebral metabolism during air transport of patients after surgery for malignant glioma
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
2008 (English)In: Aviation, Space and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 0095-6562, E-ISSN 1943-4448, Vol. 79, no 7, 700-703 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Post-operative air transport of patients following an intracranial procedure is not uncommon. The transport itself may pose a risk, and if there are harmful effects to the brain this should be reflected in the brain metabolism. The aim of this study was to analyze possible alterations in cerebral metabolism that could be caused by air transport.

METHODS: Four patients with glioblastomas were operated with a biopsy or a craniotomy. During this procedure microdialysis catheters were placed in tumor tissue or brain adjacent to tumor and in normal cerebral tissue. In this study we have analyzed cerebral glucose metabolites (glucose, lactate / pyruvate ratio), glycerol, and glutamate at five time points during a 24-h period including air transport.

RESULTS: Analyzing mean values, there was a small but significant increase in the lactate/pyruvate ratio from 45.18 to 47.78 in normal cerebral tissue after air transport compared to a previous fasting sample. For tumor tissue there was a small decrease in glucose from 1.04 to 0.92 mmol L(-1) and an increase in glutamate from 13.08 to 19.06 micromol L(-1). There were no other significant differences in the analyzed cerebral metabolites after air transport.

DISCUSSION: There were only minor differences in levels of cerebral metabolites after air transport compared to a previous fasting sample. Thus it seems that air transportation of the four reported patients did not cause any major cellular damage or metabolic changes as assessed by extracellular glucose, lactate/pyruvate ratio, glycerol, or glutamate.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 79, no 7, 700-703 p.
Keyword [en]
air transport, biopsy, cerebral metabolism, craniotomy, glioblastomas, microdialysis
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-25213DOI: 10.3357/ASEM.2280.2008PubMedID: 18619131OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-25213DiVA: diva2:229164
Available from: 2009-08-11 Created: 2009-08-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Lindvall, PeterRoslin, MichaelBergenheim, A Tommy
By organisation
Neurosurgery
In the same journal
Aviation, Space and Environmental Medicine
Neurology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 35 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf