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The effect of an early-season short-term heat pulse on plant recruitment in the Arctic
University of Copenhagen Arctic Station 3953 Qeqertarsuaq Greenland. (Umeå University Climate Impacts Research Centre, Department of Ecology and Environmental Science Box 62 98107 Abisko Sweden)
University of Copenhagen Arctic Station 3953 Qeqertarsuaq Greenland. (Aarhus University Department of Wildlife Ecology and Biodiversity, National Environmental Research Institute Grenåvej 12 8410 Rønde Denmark)
University of Antwerp, Campus Drie Eiken Research Group Plant and Vegetation Ecology, Department of Biology Universiteitsplein 1 2610 Wilrijk Belgium.
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. (University of Antwerp, Campus Drie Eiken Research Group Plant and Vegetation Ecology, Department of Biology Universiteitsplein 1 2610 Wilrijk Belgium)
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2009 (English)In: Polar Biology, ISSN 0722-4060, E-ISSN 1432-2056, Vol. 32, no 8, 1117-1126 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Climate change will cause large-scale plant migration. Seedling recruitment constitutes a bottleneck in the migration process but is itself climate-dependent. We tested the effect of warming on early establishment of three Arctic pioneer species, while holding other environmental variables constant. Seeds and bulbils were sown in artificial gaps in dry Arctic tundra and subjected to a 13-day heating of the soil surface by 2-8°C, simulating temperature increases ranging from the general summer warming to heat waves projected to occur more frequently with global warming. All species showed decreased establishment with increasing soil surface temperature. The short-term heat pulse decreased establishment of Polygonum viviparum and Saxifraga cernua, whereas establishment of Cerastium alpinum decreased with temperature due to more permanent natural variation in micro-climate. The treatment effects increased by the quadrat of the temperature increase. Warming and in particular heat waves may result in declining establishment of Arctic plants in dry tundra regions. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00300-009-0608-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2009. Vol. 32, no 8, 1117-1126 p.
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-25553DOI: 10.1007/s00300-009-0608-3OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-25553DiVA: diva2:232084
Available from: 2009-08-19 Created: 2009-08-19 Last updated: 2011-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Milbau, Ann

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