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Effectiveness of health education on Toxoplasma-related knowledge, behaviour, and risk of seroconversion in pregnancy.
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2008 (English)In: European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology, ISSN 0301-2115, E-ISSN 1872-7654, Vol. 136, no 2, 137-45 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We conducted a bibliographic literature search using MEDLINE to review the effectiveness of health education on Toxoplasma-related knowledge, behaviour, and risk of seroconversion in pregnant women. We pre-selected studies that used comparative study designs (randomized clinical trial, quasi-experimental design or historical control), that were conducted among pregnant women, and which employed specific, Toxoplasma-related outcome measures: knowledge, behaviour, or Toxoplasma infection rate. Four studies met the inclusion criteria. All had serious methodological flaws. A Belgian study reported a significant decrease in the incidence of Toxoplasma seroconversion after the introduction of intensive counselling for pregnant women about toxoplasmosis. In Poland, a significant increase in knowledge was observed after a multi-pronged, public health educational program was launched. In Canada, an increase in knowledge and prevention behaviours was reported in the intervention group receiving counselling by trained facilitators compared with the control group. In France, no significant changes in risk behaviour were observed following a physician-delivered intervention. This review highlights the weakness of the literature in the area and the lack of studies measuring actual seroconversion. There is suggestive evidence that health education approaches may help reduce risk of congenital toxoplasmosis but this problem requires further study using more rigorous research design and methodology.

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2008. Vol. 136, no 2, 137-45 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-27084DOI: 10.1016/j.ejogrb.2007.09.010PubMedID: 17977641OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-27084DiVA: diva2:276093
Available from: 2009-11-10 Created: 2009-11-10 Last updated: 2017-12-12

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Citation style
  • apa
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  • Other style
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  • de-DE
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  • en-US
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  • nn-NB
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  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
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