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Long-time results and associations between subjective visual difficulties with car driving and objective visual function 5 years after cataract surgery
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
2006 (English)In: J Cataract Refract Surg, Vol. 32, no 1, 50-55 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: To determine results and associations between subjective visual difficulties while driving and objective visual function in drivers who had cataract surgery 5 years previously. SETTING: Norrlands University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. METHODS: This prospective outcomes study examined 189 active drivers who had cataract surgery 5 years earlier. Visual acuity and low-contrast visual acuity (LCVA) were measured, and a questionnaire with driving-specific questions (VF-14 based) was completed. The results were compared with data before and after surgery. RESULTS: Five years after cataract surgery, only a small proportion of patients (3%) drove without fulfilling the visual requirements. Few patients (5%) reported visual difficulties while driving in daylight, but a large proportion (43%) experienced difficulties in darkness, with glare being the most common problem. There was a statistically significant association between an LCVA of less than 20/50 and reporting subjective visual difficulties while driving (odds ratio [OR], 2.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1 to 6.8). Women had 1.8 times the odds of reporting visual difficulties compared with men (95% CI, 1.0 to 3.5). CONCLUSIONS: Most active drivers had excellent visual acuity and no difficulty with daytime driving and distance estimation 5 years after cataract surgery. A large proportion of patients experienced difficulties while driving at night. These data suggest an adjusted association between LCVA and self-assessed visual difficulties while driving 5 years after cataract surgery. Our data confirm the importance of LCVA in relation to driving, especially in darkness.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 32, no 1, 50-55 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-30341PubMedID: 16516778OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-30341DiVA: diva2:281744
Available from: 2009-12-17 Created: 2009-12-17 Last updated: 2011-04-13

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Mönestam, EvaLundqvist, Britta

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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  • de-DE
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